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  • Neutral Density Filters... options?.

    hello everyone

    Since the camera doesn't have a built-in ND filters, I'm gonna need to look for some good options out there..

    I bought me a one cheap variable ND filter months ago to use it on the 600D (cost about 30 USD) but it was worst than crab... specially when I use it on the Tokina 11-16mm.. vignette and colour shift very noticeable specially on bright day lights and on highlights areas.

    I'm gonna have to invest on a good ND since I know I can't live without them but I need to know what are my options out there..
    What brands do you recommends? and should I go for 77 Variable ND filters and use step rings to use on other lenses or use a Square/Rectangular NDs with a Filter Holder or something..

    Thanks in advance

  • #2
    I've had very good results with the Light Craft Workshop Fader ND series. They're not cheap, but not too expensive (<$100) and I haven't noticed any loss of sharpness. I have several, and feel they are well worth it.

    http://lightcraftworkshop.com/fader-nd-mk-ii.html
    Last edited by randyman; 05-29-2012, 03:39 PM.
    Randy Walters
    boundlessinformant.com

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    • #3
      If you don't want to buy filters for every lens you have, you'd probably want to go for a matte box and plate filters.

      Like this I suppose: http://www.blackmagic-design.com/med...nemacamera.jpg

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Abobakr View Post
        hello everyone


        I bought me a one cheap variable ND filter months ago to use it on the 600D (cost about 30 USD) but it was worst than crab... specially when I use it on the Tokina 11-16mm.. vignette and colour shift very noticeable specially on bright day lights and on highlights areas.
        In my test last week with the Tokina 11-16mm, Nikon mount, I used the Tiffen UV, 77mm without noticing any size effect. I didn't use any variable ND.

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        • #5
          I have a 77mm Heliopan variable ND and really like it. Only need one filter and can use step down rings for any lens smaller than 77mm. Much more convenient than having multiple ND filters.
          http://kylemcconaghy.com | My Reel

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          • #6
            Also you will need to watch for IR pollution.
            On the Alexa, and the RED they need to place an IRCut, or IRND filter in front of the camera if they want to use more than ND0.9

            Also keep in mind, that the base sensitivity is ISO800, so - just to say an example - on a sunny day, we had to use an ND1.5, and ND0.9 to be able to set the f-stop to 3.5

            Also, the best NDs cost a lot.. Just look at the price of the Schneider Platinum IRND in the size of 4x5.65 they are $330 each!
            C300 review | http://carousel.hu/c300/

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            • #7
              thanks Randy.. well, it is quite good price compared to other brands.. I gotta check it out, thanks

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              • #8
                okay, thanks, laco.. this is the kind of info I was looking for.. Do you recommend any? what do you think about the Heliopan, or the Tiffen.. or the Light Craft Workshop as Randyman has suggested? I just heard about the Schneider Variable True-Match Vari-ND, but how does it compared to the others? I'm ready to invest on a good one.. but there seem to be a lot of of options out there to choose!!

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                • #9
                  I wouldn't buy VariNDs.
                  This will be a professional camera, so you need "normal" NDs that are good quality, and some kind of IRcut solution.
                  I myself wanted to get NDs cheaper by screw-in filters, but I think the only way to go is a mattebox with 4x4, or 4x5.65 filters..

                  For example RED cameras have a different internal IR filter, so they "like" other NDs than for example the Alexa.
                  Check the Epic test video, of course this test won't apply for the BMC: https://vimeo.com/32636719

                  The best way is to wait till the camera is production-ready, and test.
                  C300 review | http://carousel.hu/c300/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by laco View Post
                    Also you will need to watch for IR pollution.
                    On the Alexa, and the RED they need to place an IRCut, or IRND filter in front of the camera if they want to use more than ND0.9

                    Also keep in mind, that the base sensitivity is ISO800, so - just to say an example - on a sunny day, we had to use an ND1.5, and ND0.9 to be able to set the f-stop to 3.5

                    Also, the best NDs cost a lot.. Just look at the price of the Schneider Platinum IRND in the size of 4x5.65 they are $330 each!
                    You gotta put good glass in front of good glass. As for filters, I currently have an 2-stop ND and an approx. 1.3 stop CPL filter for my EF-S 17-55mm. At ISO 800, I may need to get a hold of a 1-stop filter, or move directly to a matte box + rectangular filters setup.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks guys for your infos.. were really helpful.. I'll look into your suggestions

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nickjbedford View Post
                        You gotta put good glass in front of good glass. As for filters, I currently have an 2-stop ND and an approx. 1.3 stop CPL filter for my EF-S 17-55mm. At ISO 800, I may need to get a hold of a 1-stop filter, or move directly to a matte box + rectangular filters setup.
                        I started with buying B+W filters (which is the same company as Schneider), but I regret all the money I spent on screw-in filters.
                        Sadly - a good matte box is around 800 - the mattebox-square filters are the way to go IMO.

                        Of course the good thing in the small sensor size is that even when stacking multiple screw-in ND filters you won't get vignetting.
                        C300 review | http://carousel.hu/c300/

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                        • #13
                          after using an LCW Fader ND and some cheap resin filters for Cokin P, and being dissatisfied with image quality, I ended up sticking to good-old Tiffen screw-in filters (you don't need to buy a set for each lens, just buy them big and put step-up rings in front of all your lenses) - you can check my tests here (including color shift tests, at the end; I'd expect this to be a near-non-issue on the BMC, given it's so easily solved with WB settings): http://www.similaar.com/foto/lenstests/lenstestsn.html
                          My YouTube channel

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                          • #14
                            Is this matte box any good?
                            http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DSLR-Matte...item3375bc2c55

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by KyleMcConaghy View Post
                              I have a 77mm Heliopan variable ND and really like it. Much more convenient than having multiple ND filters.
                              Which camera / lenses have you been using the Heliopan with, Kyle?
                              I also love using vari ND on small cameras, totally fits the fast, flexible shooting style and enables you to choose almost any aperture you want instantly.

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