Thread: Neutral Density Filters and the BMCC (Video link)

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  1. #1 Neutral Density Filters and the BMCC (Video link) 
    For me, transitioning from a Nikon digital SLR to digital motion picture has been fun.
    The biggest challenge I've faced on a personal level has been shooting outside in the sun. To retain the depth of field I'm used to on my D800, and without the function of high shutter speeds I've had to employ ND filters into my workflow. I like shooting with a naked lens. The glass I've invested in took time, testing, care and love.

    So I've been researching ND filters for my upcoming short film. Since I'm such a snob about my lenses its been annoying to go through this ND or that ND to find the right choice for my BMCC. Once I found this video from Abel Cinema https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_T9u-1Ib6vo my difficulties evaporated and it all became very clear.

    Check it out, good stuff there. Learn from it.
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  2. #2  
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    I'm surprised no one has responded to correct this.

    Read this giant thread: http://www.bmcuser.com/showthread.ph...-Report-Thread

    Hoya ProNDs are the way to go. Go to page 19 to see vicharris and CaptainHooks (post #183 + 185) tests. More tests post #387 from the Captain.

    rick.lang in that thread also signposted this video for Cooke miniS4/i lenses to see what strength NDs you need: http://vimeo.com/77221079

    It's shot on a C500 rather than Blackmagic but its shot at 850 iso, similar to the 800 base iso for the BMCC. Cooke mostly used 6 and 4 stop NDs and sometimes a 2 stop ND. Following the Sunny 16 rule to shoot at 800 iso on a bright sunny day you'd need an aperture of f/16 and a shutter speed of 1/800. To get that Shutter speed down to 1/50 is 4 stops. From there you can see what strength ND you need based on what F stop you like to shoot at. I generally use a ND 200 (7 2/3 stops) in such a scenario and ND 64 (6 stops) or ND 32 (4 stops) in shaded environments to get near a f/4 or f/5.6. Probably add a ND 1000 (10 stop) soon for times i need a more shallow depth of field. In City environments things can be quite diffused (pollution) so you can probably get away with slightly weaker NDs.
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member jambredz's Avatar
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    Yeh this thread definitely slipped through the cracks. Hoya PRoND filters are the way to go along with Hoya IR/UV cut filter. If you need a mattebox solution then you can check out the skier hot mirror ND filters http://bmcuser.com/showthread.php?48...ighlight=Skier You can also check out the Xume adapter system for screw in filters...it will help you attach and detach the Hoyas faster and more efficiently should you decide to go that route.

    That Abel Cine test does nothing for the cause at all...well when it comes to BMD cameras. These sensors react differently and the above filters are the best budget filters to use on them. Many here have tested it and can attest to it as gospel.
    Darren Scott
    Freelance Director/Director of Photography


    https://vimeo.com/jambredzvisions/videos
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  4. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingswell View Post
    I'm surprised no one has responded to correct this.

    Read this giant thread: http://www.bmcuser.com/showthread.ph...-Report-Thread

    Hoya ProNDs are the way to go. Go to page 19 to see vicharris and CaptainHooks (post #183 + 185) tests. More tests post #387 from the Captain.

    rick.lang in that thread also signposted this video for Cooke miniS4/i lenses to see what strength NDs you need: http://vimeo.com/77221079

    It's shot on a C500 rather than Blackmagic but its shot at 850 iso, similar to the 800 base iso for the BMCC. Cooke mostly used 6 and 4 stop NDs and sometimes a 2 stop ND. Following the Sunny 16 rule to shoot at 800 iso on a bright sunny day you'd need an aperture of f/16 and a shutter speed of 1/800. To get that Shutter speed down to 1/50 is 4 stops. From there you can see what strength ND you need based on what F stop you like to shoot at. I generally use a ND 200 (7 2/3 stops) in such a scenario and ND 64 (6 stops) or ND 32 (4 stops) in shaded environments to get near a f/4 or f/5.6. Probably add a ND 1000 (10 stop) soon for times i need a more shallow depth of field. In City environments things can be quite diffused (pollution) so you can probably get away with slightly weaker NDs.
    Maybe because we're getting tired of answering this exact question once a week due to the fact of the OP not using the search function? Just going out on a limb here
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Steve Wake's Avatar
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    I'd like to think we in the US missed it because it was Mother's Day and we had better things to do.
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    Quote Originally Posted by vicharris View Post
    Maybe because we're getting tired of answering this exact question once a week due to the fact of the OP not using the search function? Just going out on a limb here
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Wake View Post
    I'd like to think we in the US missed it because it was Mother's Day and we had better things to do.
    Wasn't attacking anyone just saying i was surprised it had slipped through as Darren stated. However these last two responses just make me not want to login here. This forum is going to die if people can't be bothered to answer people's questions, especially from the new guys, or call up information which isn't the best.

    Thanks Zodd for posting nonetheless. I can tell you had good intentions.
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    Senior Member 4saken's Avatar
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    It might help if someone could sum up the findings from the Hoya thread in a separate thread, close the whole thing so it doesn't turn into another 200 pages thread and then just sticky it, so every new user can easily find it.

    Pointing a newbie to the search function is also a bit of a dick move, especially when it comes to the whole Hoya/IR cut issue. What's wrong with helping beginners a bit? We all started out like this!
    You just can't expect everyone to go through that huge thread trying to find the correct answers. I actually read the whole thing and it took me hours to do so. Not everyone has time for that.
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  8. #8  
    Senior Member Steve Wake's Avatar
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    The second post in that thread links to Captain Hook's test, and I think that is all anyone really needs to know to make a decision. There is a lot of good discussion, tips, pointers, other comparisons, etc. in that thread, but that's why it's worth a couple of hours to read, and why it would take many hours to make a concise, worthwhile summary.

    As for my comment, I was only trying to explain why a lot of people, including myself, missed the OP's advice and failed to correct it. Though I see now it could be taken as snarky.
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