Thread: SLR Magic 25, 50 and 85 APO HyperPrime Cine Set

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  1. #251  
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    Quote Originally Posted by LochnessDigital View Post
    It means it can cover full-frame sensors.
    Meaning that the 25mm is the equivalent of a 44mm on a full-frame sensor?
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  2. #252  
    Senior Member LochnessDigital's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finster View Post
    Meaning that the 25mm is the equivalent of a 44mm on a full-frame sensor?
    No.

    It means that the image it projects onto the sensor plane is a circle that is 44mm in diameter. FF sensors have dimensions of 36x24mm, which means they have a diagonal measurement of 43.27mm. So you need a lens with at least a 44mm image circle to avoid any port-holing.

    Since we're on the BMCuser forum, the 4.6K sensor is Blackmagic's largest yet, with 29.07mm diagonal, so these lenses cover way beyond that. You definitely won't have any port-holing on a Blackmagic camera and you should have little to no vignetting either.
    Aaron Lochert
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  3. #253  
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    Just got my set in today. Hoping to take it through a series of tests in the next couple weeks.
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  4. #254  
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    When you guys use these lenses (or any lens for that matter), do you think in terms of "35mm Equivalent"? I feel like I'm always thinking that way ... whether using my GH4, or Fuji XT2.

    The same conversion applies to these lenses, right? If I used a MFT-PL adapter on my GH4, then the SLR Magic 25mm APO HyperPrime would be the 35mm equivalent of 50mm, yes?

    The 35mm equivalent on the URSA 4.6K would be ... about 36mm???

    I can't imagine Roger Deakins thinks this way. If he's on the Arri Alexa, and his AC hands him the the SLR Magic 25mm APO HyperPrime, does he think "Ahhh, 38mm!"?
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  5. #255  
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    No, no he (Deakins) does not think of lens focal lengths in terms of full frame 35mm equivalents, only someone with no to little experience in Cine/video formats, but with 35mm still camera experience thinks this way! If he want a normal AOV shot, the knows he wants a 35mm lens, or 28mm for a slightly wide shot.

    When you try to make a focal length equivalent comparison, you are doing an apples to oranges comparison. Full frame 35mm and Cine formats are not the same aspect ratio, and a given focal length Les is going to look different in each camera, even if they are equivalent focal lengths.

    You need to start thinking of lens focal length in terms to the camera and format you are using. Forget about the 135mm 24x36 format, and trying to compare it to S35 Cine format. Embrace your Super 35mm Cine format, learn that a 35mm focal, length is your "normal" angle of view, and go from there. You want wide, then to to 25mm or 18mm, you want a tighter shot, then go to 45 or 50mm.
    Cheers
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  6. #256  
    Senior Member LochnessDigital's Avatar
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    In the digital age where there's dozens of different sized sensors (and sensor crop modes) out there, remembering angle of view can be helpful. I always felt that it was a bit dangerous to have a specific focal length number ingrained into your mind. What we really need to become attached to is the angle of view.

    Of course, the prep takes a little more effort: Your first order of business upon getting a lens set would be to calculate all the angles of view and label all your lenses for your specific camera.

    But from that point forward, you would just remember that a 40 degree horizontal angle of view is normal. For S35mm you'd be using a 35mm, for FF a 50mm, for S16, a 17mm.

    I own an Epic-W, and I was initially under the impression that it was Super 35. But it turns out it's beyond S35, so my normal on that camera is a 40mm. Same happened when I had a BMCC, it was an abnormal size, so normal is more like a 22mm.

    Point is, aiming for a "FF equivalent" is misguided to me. What you're really aiming for is a specific angle of view, so why not just call a spade a spade.
    Aaron Lochert
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  7. #257  
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    Totally makes sense. Thanks guys.
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  8. #258  
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    Quote Originally Posted by LochnessDigital View Post
    In the digital age where there's dozens of different sized sensors (and sensor crop modes) out there, remembering angle of view can be helpful. I always felt that it was a bit dangerous to have a specific focal length number ingrained into your mind. What we really need to become attached to is the angle of view.

    Of course, the prep takes a little more effort: Your first order of business upon getting a lens set would be to calculate all the angles of view and label all your lenses for your specific camera.

    But from that point forward, you would just remember that a 40 degree horizontal angle of view is normal. For S35mm you'd be using a 35mm, for FF a 50mm, for S16, a 17mm.

    I own an Epic-W, and I was initially under the impression that it was Super 35. But it turns out it's beyond S35, so my normal on that camera is a 40mm. Same happened when I had a BMCC, it was an abnormal size, so normal is more like a 22mm.

    Point is, aiming for a "FF equivalent" is misguided to me. What you're really aiming for is a specific angle of view, so why not just call a spade a spade.
    THIS.

    Also....this.
    Cameras: Blackmagic Cinema Camera, Blackmagic Pocket Camera (x2), Panasonic GH2 (x2), Sony RX100 ii, Canon 6D, Canon T2i,
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  9. #259  
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    Did a nice little test with just two APO lenses. Very strong backlit scenes, available light. I think these lenses are such a good buy for the money, love them !

    https://youtu.be/0PUZYjGvq6A
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  10. #260  
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    OK, so it's with an Olympus and not exactly lens test material, but here's a couple of little shoots I've done with the APO primes. Many of the close ups in these two shorts are APO's. I also made the ungraded files available as a download.

    https://johnbrawley.wordpress.com/20...ympus-does-4k/

    I'm honestly very very impressed with these lenses. I think they are really coming into their own now.

    JB
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