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Cinematography: Theory & Practice, 2nd Edition

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  • trapper
    replied
    You might also want to check out Shot by Shot by Katz.

    Leave a comment:


  • Luke Armstrong
    replied
    It can slow you down, sure - I used to think the same way, but I've since been on shoots where the director has wants playback so thats what we do.

    It all depends on the schedule and the ethos of the crew. Sometimes it can actually save time if you make sure you know what you've got, rather than just shooting until you have to stop!

    Leave a comment:


  • nickjbedford
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim Hole View Post
    I think it really depends on preference and the type of shoot. If you are making a pretty humble film and you enjoy all the aspects of the craft then by all means do it. There is the art of it, and the business of it. Personally I enjoy every element of filmmaking (I don't act...or have never tried). What I would say is get a good gaffer. If you tell the gaffer exactly what you want, or even the overview of where you want the light to come from and the type of light, that's all a good gaffer needs and he/she will lilkely know more than you about lights and rigs anyway. Naturally you are going to miss the nuances of the actors performances if you are operating, but that's the choice you have made. However it does immediately strike you if it felt wrong. I often operate and direct but that's mainly out of habit of DPing other people's films, and rarely have got the chance to make my own projects...

    If you are doing a project that involves multiple camera setups, more than a few cast members in the scene etc...you will be stretching yourself way too thin though. Its all about trust. Finding people that you can trust.
    It was mainly the act of having to watch takes after shooting them to make sure they worked. That wouldn't be efficient on a professional set with a more than tiny crew and actors and a budget, especially when you're strapped for time. I don't mind doing it in the short term, but I can see it being a problem as complexity grows. But I do know that my path lies down cinematography more than directing.

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  • Tim Hole
    replied
    I think it really depends on preference and the type of shoot. If you are making a pretty humble film and you enjoy all the aspects of the craft then by all means do it. There is the art of it, and the business of it. Personally I enjoy every element of filmmaking (I don't act...or have never tried). What I would say is get a good gaffer. If you tell the gaffer exactly what you want, or even the overview of where you want the light to come from and the type of light, that's all a good gaffer needs and he/she will lilkely know more than you about lights and rigs anyway. Naturally you are going to miss the nuances of the actors performances if you are operating, but that's the choice you have made. However it does immediately strike you if it felt wrong. I often operate and direct but that's mainly out of habit of DPing other people's films, and rarely have got the chance to make my own projects...

    If you are doing a project that involves multiple camera setups, more than a few cast members in the scene etc...you will be stretching yourself way too thin though. Its all about trust. Finding people that you can trust.

    Leave a comment:


  • kevin baggott
    replied
    Well i must say I disagree to yer using the words "trivial." "It's obvious why they're separate roles in anything but trivial micro-budget projects."
    I just finished a feature film that I wrote, directed and played the lead and wound up being the cinematographer as well.
    Do I wish I had a DP - sure - but just didn't have the budget. Self financed. I'm actually feeling at the moment I wish I had edited it as well. No reflection on my editor but...
    But looking at the film objectively - what I like about it - and what Ive always loved about films that the writer/director also acts in is that it feels personal.
    For better or worse - yer getting a singular vision communicated. I miss this kind of personal cinema. Half of cassavettes films are out of focus - not cause he was the dp - but he was trying to get to the soul of the actor.
    I was recently looking at dp reels for a new feature im doing - and the photography was great in a lot of the work - but the content was so heartless, vacuous. I'm choking on sexy photography. As Godard said once "the greatest cinematographer is Kodak!"
    Are there artist who are cinematographers - of course. Anyway - i don't mean to preach - but I'm hoping with the advent of cameras like the black magic, hacked gh2, etc that folks can afford to make more personal cinema again and get a real mule kick out of the images. - will people want to see it - I doubt it.

    Thought id post a little trailer for the film - it's not been color corrected nor has the sound been mixed - the film is in post - this was just something i put together for the cast - enuf caveats.

    https://vimeo.com/41895564
    Last edited by kevin baggott; 07-26-2012, 10:00 PM. Reason: added a link

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  • nickjbedford
    replied
    Originally posted by RyGuy View Post
    It's definitely why there is a dedicated director and DoP in almost every production, large and small. My brother and I got our start in wedding videos about 4/5 years ago, sometimes shooting 3 or 4 a day, and learned, to some extent, how to focus on whats going in the camera, as well as composition. But it's not easy, nor does it yield the best results. So yah, if can, do but if can't, then do both haha.

    Let me know what you think of the book when you're done!
    Will do I know that if I'm personally invested in creating and directing the story, I would have a hard time handing it over to anyone who I didn't know could deliver in the directing department. Luckily, I know of one person at least

    Leave a comment:


  • RyGuy
    replied
    It's definitely why there is a dedicated director and DoP in almost every production, large and small. My brother and I got our start in wedding videos about 4/5 years ago, sometimes shooting 3 or 4 a day, and learned, to some extent, how to focus on whats going in the camera, as well as composition. But it's not easy, nor does it yield the best results. So yah, if can, do but if can't, then do both haha.

    Let me know what you think of the book when you're done!

    Leave a comment:


  • nickjbedford
    replied
    Originally posted by RyGuy View Post
    Very true.
    I found that I didn't notice aspects of the performance while focusing on the camera movement and that I would have to watch the takes to make sure the actors' performances were on the money and we could move on. Luckily it wasn't a rush job.

    But the bit of experience I get in directing will help. I'm dedicated to learning the storytelling aspects of cinematography.

    Leave a comment:


  • RyGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by nickjbedford View Post
    it only took one shoot weekend to realise that both directing and filming is difficult to do on set and that the photography is what I would choose to focus on. It's obvious why they're separate roles in anything but trivial micro-budget projects.
    Very true.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickjbedford
    replied
    Thanks guys. I definitely feel that despite my directing my first few music videos (first one half done), I'll be shifting toward focusing on becoming a DoP, given that photography is basically where I come from anyway.

    Story is paramount to me as well, and I've even done a bit of narrative writing in the past, but it only took one shoot weekend to realise that both directing and filming is difficult to do on set and that the photography is what I would choose to focus on. It's obvious why they're separate roles in anything but trivial micro-budget projects.

    Leave a comment:


  • kevin baggott
    replied
    I'd second kingswell suggestion as well - If It's Purple, Someone's Gonna Die: The Power of Color in Visual Storytelling.
    A really great book for filmmakers is david bordwells figures traced in light.

    Leave a comment:


  • kevin baggott
    replied
    yes - It's a very good book.
    Personally I thought the five c's of cinematography by joseph mascelli the best one of them all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kingswell
    replied
    I have it Nick. I would say its a very good overall picture of Cinematography, and sets you on your way, or at least it did for me. From there i supplemented it with other books, which covered areas which were missing or light For example

    There wasn't much talk about colour (or color) so i got this book: If It's Purple, Someone's Gonna Die: The Power of Color in Visual Storytelling . I think colour is often overlooked as a storytelling tool. Very good read.

    I also got Master Shots: 100 Advanced Camera Techniques which is a very practical book about how to pull off certain shots. Very useful for preplanning. E.G I want to do an exciting entrance shot. I go to Master Shots and go to chapter 3: Entrance & Exits. Very handy

    Cinematic Storytelling is another book about shots, but aimed more towards the academic understanding of how they work in films and the meaning they give.

    For lighting i have Gerald Millerson's Lighting for Television & Film It's a dry boring technical handbook about lighting and i hate reading it. But it's very comprehensive, and worth getting. It's also very expensive (about 90 of your Aussie Dollars). If you can't find one-you can borrow mine for as long as you like.

    Our Barry [Green] has a dvd about Lighting, which i've not seen but if its anything like his other dvds will be brilliant.

    Can be pricey, but i generally find ebay is a good place to stalk especially with auctions, there generally isn't much demand/competition.

    Leave a comment:


  • RyGuy
    replied
    Looks good to me. Or at least the reviews do. I say read everything you can, and take away only what you want. I know this is a forum about a camera, and cinematography rules the streets here, but I've been focusing more on screenwriting books. I've learned that no matter how awesome something looks, if the story sucks then the whole piece sucks. But not the other way around. Sorry not trying to start a story is king thing here.

    Let us know what you think, coming from a photography background! I know that I need to focus and learn about lighting a lot more.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickjbedford
    started a topic Cinematography: Theory & Practice, 2nd Edition

    Cinematography: Theory & Practice, 2nd Edition

    I ordered this yesterday. I don't want to leave stumbling onto really important yet trivial techniques and knowledge up to chance, as I've recently realised I may have missed a very important lighting tip from JB.

    It's already on its way but can anyone vouch for it? Just curious.

    http://www.amazon.com/Cinematography.../dp/0240812093
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