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  • Shooting Real Estate?

    Hey guys,

    I’m starting to work on some real estate videos this weekend, which is a little out of my comfort zone. Besides shooting with ultrawide lenses (I’ll be using a Tokina 11-16 with my Ursa Mini), what else is specific to this kind of videos? Frame rate, shutter angles?...

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Very slow, smooth pushes and tracks can be very difficult without a good head and slider/dolly. Ronin is not a good solution. If you can't get one of those have a really good set of sticks and a nice head at least. Clients want sharp, saturated shots. They usually don't want a cinematic look. Watch out for any filters you use causing problems with coated windows as well.

    In my experience real estate clients want drone footage as well if there is property or a view.

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    • #3
      Constant movement. Slider, gimbal anything to constantly have the camera moving through a space. Pick angles that show off how large a space can be and you also need a drone for aireil shots of the land. Don't be affraid to get some broll of the local attractions nearby. They love a good after effects title, a cool pop up one with their pictures at the end is always good and in the airiel shots use aftereffects to track titles or outline the area for sale.

      I'd probably go with 50p here in Australia to get 2x slow-mo if I need itshould help to get smooth footage. Practical lights are really great.

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      • #4
        Thanks guys. I'm taking my shark slider and the glidecam. I was wondering if it's regular practice in this kind of work to take lights to balance the exposure between the windows and the interiors. Most guys I know that shoot real estates don't use lights which is weird. The only way to nail good exposure without lights, would be to always shoot at sunset...
        Last edited by david evans; 01-03-2019, 04:26 AM.

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        • #5
          Unless the property has large windows as features I would not worry about blowing out generic windows. You can also shoot raw. Pick specific views you want to emphasize and shoot for those scenes but otherwise interior should be about the interior.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by GeranSimpson View Post
            Unless the property has large windows as features I would not worry about blowing out generic windows. You can also shoot raw. Pick specific views you want to emphasize and shoot for those scenes but otherwise interior should be about the interior.
            Thanks. Out of curiosity, what frame rate would you use as a project frame rate for a real estate video?

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            • #7
              30. With 60 fps you can conform to 30 and make your slow moves much nicer. Just watch out for moving objects in the frame that give it away (water, trees etc)

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              • #8
                Never, and I will emphasize Never, shoot cinematic look. It has to be vivid and saturated colors, bright. Best combo kit is (1) a GH5 or A7s with a (2) gimbal, (3) wide lens, and a good (4) dolly/slider (something like a Dana Dolly or the cheaper Glide Gear Dev 4, 6" hi-hat and smooth fluid head. You will also want a drone as well - this is now expected by clients in the USA - no drone no business. Another thing that's getting asked is the use of a 360 cam. You can get away with a circular slider track. Shot at 60 fps per sec and conform to 30 as that will be pretty much the standard. Shoot in 4K but deliver in 1080p. Slow, smooth, almost picturesque shoots. Good luck.

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                • #9
                  Thanks guys. I will have the agent talking to the camera. Won't it look cheap at 30 fps or is that motion rendering to be expected in this kind of work?

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                  • #10
                    Are you guys getting paid well for this kind of work? I've been asked to quote a few of these projects but my quotes were too high. They both ended up using a kid with a drone and paying $250.

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                    • #11
                      Use lights and balance. Look at architectural photos. It is a science and has an exact look. Here is a Silicon Valley go to. She does photos only, this is the look. "Architectural Digest." Think rules of painting. https://www.facebook.com/agajphoto/

                      You can shoot well lit stills and dolly in, out and side ways in post rather than use a slider. Less equipment and set up. Time is better spent on nailing lighting and thinking the shots through so your reflection is not visible. You need to be sharp so you need to light and close down if shooting ff or s35.


                      My son shoots for builders in Argentina. He does 6 to 8 promotion videos a year typically for condo towers. Drone shots are mandatory. For traveling shots rather than dealing with the Ronin they will just use the drone gimbal hand held.

                      I am designer/project manager. When I am forced to I do my own photography but am really too busy with designing and execution. I have my son fly in to take our photos. I line up 20 houses. He will do 2, sometimes 3 a day.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jmad View Post
                        Are you guys getting paid well for this kind of work? I've been asked to quote a few of these projects but my quotes were too high. They both ended up using a kid with a drone and paying $250.
                        Real estate videos much like weddings. Its cool and looks great! But don't want to pay! Mark my words...I live in the fastest growing city in america and you might make money on a multi million dollar home.But even that is minimal!

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