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Building your own lights with LED Strips

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  • #46
    If you are using LEDs, all yo need are the lenses, some cardboard or fiberboard tubes, and a box. Add reflectors, gaffers tape, and you have a spot/flood fixture.
    DS

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    • #47
      /\ they do make a fair amount of heat, which is what the big cpu style heat synk and fan is for.
      Plus you're going to want to be able to mount it on a proper stand and aim it like anything else...
      "Senior Member"???... Really???...
      Not to be taken seriously...by anyone.....

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      • #48
        I'm thinking Speed Ring into a big Soft Box. Could be DIY.

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        • #49
          @KurtF Are there any solutions to mount a bowens mount to something? There are great accessories on the used market but I do not know what to search for.
          www.instagram.com/vautksch

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Rotbart View Post
            @KurtF Are there any solutions to mount a bowens mount to something? There are great accessories on the used market but I do not know what to search for.
            I posted this earlier in the thread, but I'm currently working on a project where I'm putting an 100w LED in the middle of this

            https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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            • #51
              That's very cool! Missed that actually. Would you mind posting your progress?
              www.instagram.com/vautksch

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              • #52
                Yes, very interesting indeed. Good luck with the projects.
                Cheers

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                • #53
                  Just wanted to post some images from my Bowens flash mount 100w LED project. It's all come together pretty well though everything is still in a very rough state. Electronics are setup and light is tenuously mounted in the bowens s mount flash holder I posted earlier. Right now it is a low CRI generic 100w LED as I wanted to see how realistic it was before going and buying an $80 yuji high CRI LED. Excuse the messy workspace and crappy phone pics. Feeling optimistic about this project!

                  IMAG0459.jpg

                  IMAG0461.jpg

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                  • #54
                    Cool! That looks like a great base. throw some aluminium pipe at the end and you are good to go. Will copy the design, if you dont mind?
                    Also, add this to it and you are done: https://www.amazon.de/NANGUANG-Fresn...ywords=fresnel
                    Last edited by Rotbart; 10-20-2016, 11:42 PM.
                    www.instagram.com/vautksch

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                    • #55
                      Love reading all the ideas and DIY innovation!

                      We created some knowledge resources for those using LED ribbon lights, including reviewing three brands of ribbon lights (Yuji, LiteGear, and Lighting Ever), color quality measurements, voltage issues, and a handful of accessories. I thought I'd point them out in case they are helpful to anyone: http://indiecinemaacademy.com/led-ri...our-own-light/

                      Also, for those diving into bicolor light, we did a nearly exhaustive color analysis of what happens to various color values as daylight balanced and tungsten balanced Yuji ribbon lights are mixed. Those who need high color quality might find this interesting: http://indiecinemaacademy.com/comple...olor-analysis/

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Indie Cinema Academy View Post
                        Love reading all the ideas and DIY innovation!

                        We created some knowledge resources for those using LED ribbon lights, including reviewing three brands of ribbon lights (Yuji, LiteGear, and Lighting Ever), color quality measurements, voltage issues, and a handful of accessories. I thought I'd point them out in case they are helpful to anyone: http://indiecinemaacademy.com/led-ri...our-own-light/

                        Also, for those diving into bicolor light, we did a nearly exhaustive color analysis of what happens to various color values as daylight balanced and tungsten balanced Yuji ribbon lights are mixed. Those who need high color quality might find this interesting: http://indiecinemaacademy.com/comple...olor-analysis/
                        Thanks for posting this. It's the basic building blocks that I needed to move forward without being intimidated. I'll take a little while to digest it. Thanks again.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Indie Cinema Academy View Post
                          Love reading all the ideas and DIY innovation!

                          We created some knowledge resources for those using LED ribbon lights, including reviewing three brands of ribbon lights (Yuji, LiteGear, and Lighting Ever), color quality measurements, voltage issues, and a handful of accessories. I thought I'd point them out in case they are helpful to anyone: http://indiecinemaacademy.com/led-ri...our-own-light/

                          Also, for those diving into bicolor light, we did a nearly exhaustive color analysis of what happens to various color values as daylight balanced and tungsten balanced Yuji ribbon lights are mixed. Those who need high color quality might find this interesting: http://indiecinemaacademy.com/comple...olor-analysis/
                          Hey Ryan!
                          Two things with your article that bug me, but first let me thank you, your article was one of the articles that made me buy several reeles of Yuji strips and experiment with LED ribbons. Thanks!
                          Firstly, the dimmer you link in the first article is serious garbage it is not really made for a lot of power (fried on many many people) and secondly, you state that voltage dimming is not good for LEDs which I can not say is wrong, BUT when using the PWN Dimming that is used for household applications you will have terrible flicker, which is why I ask myself if you have even used the dimmer in the article? So unless you have a PWN Dimmer that operates at high frequencies like 10K, you have to use voltage regulators.
                          www.instagram.com/vautksch

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Marshall Harrington View Post
                            Thanks for posting this. It's the basic building blocks that I needed to move forward without being intimidated. I'll take a little while to digest it. Thanks again.
                            You are welcome! The basics of designing your own LED light is fairly simple, but I totally understand how scary that first step can be. My suggestion is to get a cheap reel of LED ribbon lights to practice on. Once you see how easy that is, you are ready to buy the higher quality LED ribbons.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Rotbart View Post
                              Hey Ryan!
                              Two things with your article that bug me, but first let me thank you, your article was one of the articles that made me buy several reeles of Yuji strips and experiment with LED ribbons. Thanks!
                              Firstly, the dimmer you link in the first article is serious garbage it is not really made for a lot of power (fried on many many people) and secondly, you state that voltage dimming is not good for LEDs which I can not say is wrong, BUT when using the PWN Dimming that is used for household applications you will have terrible flicker, which is why I ask myself if you have even used the dimmer in the article? So unless you have a PWN Dimmer that operates at high frequencies like 10K, you have to use voltage regulators.
                              Hey Rotbart,

                              [This is actually Tim, since I wrote the two LED articles.]

                              Thanks for your thoughts. Using and making LEDs is a continuous learning process for me, and I enjoy the questions. I learned the electrical side nearly two decades ago, although applying it to modern LEDs has been a recent thing (a couple years ago).

                              * The dimmer: We have used this dimmer on small applications where highlights are placed throughout the scene, and have had no problems. One mistake some people make is not using a power supply that is powerful enough, which can result in flicker. We've bought a bunch of these dimmers, although from different sources. One source sent a bad dimmer that flickered badly. Not sure if it was a knockoff, or if it was a quality control issue. The rest are great! I even use one to place ribbon lights behind my flat screen television so I'm not staring at a spotlight every evening. We dim is near the bottom of the range, and have never noticed flicker.

                              All that being said, these aren't for high amps. They are rated for 12amp at 12 volts, although we've only used them up to 8 or 9 amps. I'll have to go back and test the limits of that dimmer to know more. Sorry to hear it's given so many people problems.

                              * Voltage dimming: yes, voltage dimming is not good for LEDs. The biggest issue is it changes the CCT (color temp) of the light as it is dimmed. Since the application of LEDs for most users on this forum is for pretty pictures with high quality light, changing the CCT of the LED as it is dimmed is not good.

                              Another problem with voltage dimming is at the lower ends, since each diode might require slightly different amounts of voltage just to be dimly lit. This is especially noticeable with ribbon lights. I tried this by setting my power supply to a VERY low voltage, then slowly turned up the juice. I could see certain LEDs turn on and stay lit before there was anything from other emitters. You end up with this weird random array of LEDs with some on and some off.

                              PWM (pulse width modulators) dimmers that are low quality can cause flicker when dimmed too much because they often don't run at high enough cycles. But good PWM dimmers cycle fast enough to remove flicker. You don't need to go as high as 10khz for this, 1khz should be fine. Most pre-built LED units use this PWM dimmer anyway. With DIY projects, you really need to correctly source your dimmer and be willing to pay for quality, although quality PWM dimmers aren't that much. Be sure to be above 300hz. For those who have noticed how LED car taillights seem to strobe when looking side-to-side quickly, those are on 200hz dimmers.
                              Last edited by Indie Cinema Academy; 11-01-2016, 03:54 PM. Reason: clarity

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                              • #60
                                Bump: As an update - Matt, of DIY Perks, is recommending this LED Strip.

                                https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...VU3K6B7YBN2FFO

                                The Color Rendering Index is 80+ and the brightness is quite good. The cost is reasonable, for those of us who can't afford the $100+ Yugi LED Strips (or didn't make it to the RedUser Group Buy).
                                These strips are available in three color temps 3K to 3.5K (warm white), 4K to 4.5K (neutral white), and 6K to 6.5K (cool white), so should meet most folks needs.

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