Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

3:1 and 4:1 CinemaDNG compression options added to slimRAW

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Thanks, Frank!
    Shutter Angle: The science and magic of shooting moving pictures

    Comment


    • #17
      Version 1.7 is now released. slimRAW can now downscale CinemaDNG to half the original resolution: 2.3K CinemaDNG from 4.6K CinemaDNG, 2K from 4K, FullHD from UltraHD, etc. You can feed it any resolution, but this is obviously targeted at UltraHD cameras and above; so in BM land it means BMP4K, URSA, URSA Mini. For all practical purposes the downscaled "raw" files behave like off the camera CinemaDNG, so you can use them in whatever way you find suitable.

      That said, the main motivation was creating raw proxies from high res CinemaDNG (which used together with 5:1 compression will result in 20:1 size reduction for uncompressed input), thus greatly reducing streaming, CPU and GPU power needed for editing and coloring, while at the same time keeping the flexibility of the raw workflow. When using 5:1 compression, this means approx. 1080p ProResHQ data rates for 2.3K raw proxies from the Mini4.6K, and approx. 1080p ProRes422 data rates for 2K raw proxies from 4K cameras. Certainly, if storage space is critical, you can also deliver from the downscaled footage (when the delivery targets are <2K). This is a Bayer-to-Bayer rescale (and aliasing artifacts are inevitable when preserving resonable sharpness), but there are less artifacts compared to on-sensor binning and lineskipping.

      Here is a small write-up on using DNG proxies in Resolve and Premiere, as well as why it might be beneficial to use raw proxies instead of traditional proxy codecs.

      Another addition (unrelated to compression/size) is the ability to enforce specific DNG white level metadata values for fixing tints in highlights (see, for example, here how/when to use this feature).
      Shutter Angle: The science and magic of shooting moving pictures

      Comment


      • #18
        CPC, that's super interesting. I've never tried using raw proxies but I'm going to give it a whirl.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by cpc View Post
          Another addition (unrelated to compression/size) is the ability to enforce specific DNG white level metadata values for fixing tints in highlights (see, for example, here how/when to use this feature).
          This is something I'm really interested in, because I often see magenta'ish highlights in my BMPCC footage. I'm not sure I totally understand that thread, but it sounds like if I dial in the DNG WhiteValue to 27850 for BMCC/BMPCC footage it should solve the "minus-green" problem in the highlights?

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Alex.Mitchell View Post
            This is something I'm really interested in, because I often see magenta'ish highlights in my BMPCC footage. I'm not sure I totally understand that thread, but it sounds like if I dial in the DNG WhiteValue to 27850 for BMCC/BMPCC footage it should solve the "minus-green" problem in the highlights?
            27580 is the nominal white level for the 4K BM cameras (after linearization). For the Pocket and the BMCC it is significantly higher: 50000+ and 60000+.
            If you have a tinting issue, the actual number you need to set will usually be camera specific (and not just model dependent). Ideally, you'd want to reduce the level to the highest value that clears the tint. You don't want to overdo it with an unnecessarily low number, cause this is effectively lowering the clipping point. In the link above Iliah has described solutions to two different highlights tint cases using RawDigger to observe and make sense of the numbers. By all means, do play with it if you want, it can be instructive. But you don't have to go technical. Trial and error can quickly find a solution just fine (some kind of a manual binary search should lead to a good value with a few tries).
            Shutter Angle: The science and magic of shooting moving pictures

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Mark Howser View Post
              CPC, that's super interesting. I've never tried using raw proxies but I'm going to give it a whirl.
              I find that CinemaDNG proxies have a great synergy with Resolve. Resolve is excellent with DNG and you can change the media top source folder with a couple of clicks in the Media Pool at any time, so switching from proxies to originals and back is a breeze. Premiere is also getting better with each new version, although it is no match for Resolve in the DNG handling department.
              Last edited by cpc; 11-10-2016, 01:07 PM.
              Shutter Angle: The science and magic of shooting moving pictures

              Comment


              • #22
                You got my business! The 3:1 lossy looks pretty great in Resolve and can solve the problem of how to wrestle with these huge files. Thanks!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by JoshuOne View Post
                  You got my business! The 3:1 lossy looks pretty great in Resolve and can solve the problem of how to wrestle with these huge files. Thanks!
                  Thanks.
                  Which camera are you using? If it is the Production4K (huge files? ), it also works very well with the higher compression levels. It has a really fat image, so lots of leeway for additional compression.
                  Shutter Angle: The science and magic of shooting moving pictures

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Is lossy working in Adobe Premier yet? Would be nice if Avid would support it, I wouldn't hold my breath they don't even support straight up C-DNG they say it's up to the camera manufacturers to make the plugins even though it's an open standard (I wish Blackmagic or someone else would though.).

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Jason Finnigan View Post
                      Is lossy working in Adobe Premier yet? Would be nice if Avid would support it, I wouldn't hold my breath they don't even support straight up C-DNG they say it's up to the camera manufacturers to make the plugins even though it's an open standard (I wish Blackmagic or someone else would though.).
                      No support for lossy CinemaDNG in Premiere yet.
                      Shutter Angle: The science and magic of shooting moving pictures

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        slimRAW 1.8 is now up on the site. It adds 7:1 compression, which will yield data sizes around 25% smaller than 5:1.

                        Mainly targeting resolutions beyond 4K (Mini 4.6K, DJI X5S; possibly the Blackmagic 4K cameras as they have a really fat image), and particularly useful in the case when 1080p/2K delivery is intended. Also, well suited for CinemaDNG proxies -- coupled with 2x downscale for a 28:1 reduction (in case you haven't checked it out, here is the raw proxies write-up).
                        All lossy compression got a wee bit of a performance boost, so updating is recommended.
                        Shutter Angle: The science and magic of shooting moving pictures

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X