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  • 77mm ir variable nd filter

    Hi! Does anyone try this filter?

    New Tiffen variND with IR cut:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...e_neutral.html

    How good it is? Can`t find any review.

    I have tiffens nd 0.3 0.9 and 1.2 and i can`t say i`m happy Looking for a variable solution with good ir cut.

    Thanks

  • #2
    I haven't tried that filter, but i recently bought a cheap (like, 20 times cheaper than the Tiffen) vari ND from ebay. This one:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/191380376965...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

    As it was so cheap, i thought i wouldn't lose much by trying it out. I was actually very positively surprised by the results i got. There's a bit of brownish color shift, but not too bad, and no IR pollution to speak of. The color is rather constant across the whole range. I only did a quick and completely unscientific test, but based on it, i will probably put the filter to actual use.

    The test i did:

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B6...dlE&authuser=0

    There's legend of the settings used on the bottom of the screen. The f number is ???, as i used a Nikon lens with EF mount adapter, and there's no indication of the aperture on the f-stop lever.
    Last edited by Halsu; 02-21-2015, 02:33 AM.
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1402300/
    http://www.kolumbus.fi/erkki.halkka/cv.html

    Comment


    • #3
      The general recommendation I see around here is to use a Hoya IR cut and then use whatever ND you would like. Some guys swear by Vari-NDs, personally I use standard ND filters since they seem to retain color and sharpness better. Of course everything these days is subject to opinion. I would say this, though: If you aren't happy with the Tiffen standard NDs, what reason would you have for thinking their Variable ND would be any better?

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      • #4
        That thing is crazy thick and I'm sure it's just an IR filter behind the polarizes. Personally for BM Cameras you should go with the Hoya IR Cut and SLR Magics new Vari ND though it only goes to ND1.8.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Halsu View Post
          I haven't tried that filter, but i recently bought a cheap (like, 20 times cheaper than the Tiffen) vari ND from ebay. This one:

          http://www.ebay.com/itm/191380376965...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

          As it was so cheap, i thought i wouldn't lose much by trying it out. I was actually very positively surprised by the results i got. There's a bit of brownish color shift, but not too bad, and no IR pollution to speak of. The color is rather constant across the whole range. I only did a quick and completely unscientific test, but based on it, i will probably put the filter to actual use.

          The test i did:
          https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B6...dlE&authuser=0

          There's legend of the settings used on the bottom of the screen. The f number is ???, as i used a Nikon lens with EF mount adapter, and there's no indication of the aperture on the f-stop lever.
          Hmm I might have to get this as I'm trying with a lightsetup for an upcoming vacation
          www.lightformfilm.com
          https://vimeo.com/suwanchote

          follow me on instagram @lightformfilm

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by vicharris View Post
            That thing is crazy thick and I'm sure it's just an IR filter behind the polarizes. Personally for BM Cameras you should go with the Hoya IR Cut and SLR Magics new Vari ND though it only goes to ND1.8.
            Interesting to read about the SLR Magics new Vari ND. Are there any reports or tests that it cuts the IR pollution on BM cameras?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Note Suwanchote View Post
              Hmm I might have to get this as I'm trying with a lightsetup for an upcoming vacation
              I picked one of these up (the cheap ebay one Halsu linked) on some random online special somewhere last year under the brand 'Nature'. It gets some points for being light and inexpensive, but without IR cut you will get IR pollution. The slight brown cast hides it a little at first glance, but it's there. I've found rotating the whole filter to tame the polarization can do a lot for the brown cast.

              The image gets quite soft by 50mm and it starts to get pretty nasty looking beyond 50mm. That softness could be useful to some, but there are some additional caveats: light halation around light sources, not too unpleasant to my eye, but something to be aware of, and it adds a bit of a distracting texture to wide aperture bokeh that can be quite noticeable in some situations (high contrast foliage being one), but stopping down disguises it nicely.

              So, I wouldn't recommend it for most paid gigs (barring creative uses and personal standards, of course), but for travel or home video stuff, it's not bad in the wide to normal range, maybe some short telephoto (depending on your tastes with softness), but overall this thing looks performs better with the taking lens stopped down 2+ stops, not necessary, obviously, but noticeably superior.

              Since it's so cheap you don't have to be nervous sticking about it into unpredictable and new shooting environments.

              On a TV pilot I shoved this thing in a bag with a BMPCC into an icebox to get a shot with an ice scoop coming about 2 inches from the lens, which I probably wouldn't have considered doing with a more expensive filter (or camera, for that matter).
              Last edited by JuMo; 02-21-2015, 02:23 AM.

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              • #8
                Looks like the test video i made was not public, fixed that.

                https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B6...dlE&authuser=0
                http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1402300/
                http://www.kolumbus.fi/erkki.halkka/cv.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JuMo View Post
                  I picked one of these up (the cheap ebay one Halsu linked) on some random online special somewhere last year under the brand 'Nature'. It gets some points for being light and inexpensive, but without IR cut you will get IR pollution. The slight brown cast hides it a little at first glance, but it's there. I've found rotating the whole filter to tame the polarization can do a lot for the brown cast.
                  Thanks a lot for the info - i'll do some more testing too, when i have time...
                  http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1402300/
                  http://www.kolumbus.fi/erkki.halkka/cv.html

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I wouldn't recomend this cheap nd fader. I have the same one and it has a green color cast and x patter after 7stops i think. no ir cut. try to use it with wide lense and not at the cloudy day. You will see how ugly it is. IR cut is must have with blackmagic cameras. Im going to buy hoya pro nd, because they are one of the best for BM, and has good ir cut by default. But i still looking for a good vary nd filter with no iq degradation.

                    https://vimeo.com/55452414 - - really good video about filters and effects to the different sensors. You can see that tiffens with built in ir cut is very good for bm sensors, so i asked you, guys, about the filter in the first post, which seems to be good.

                    Thank you for your replies and sorry for my poor English.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tihon View Post
                      try to use it with wide lense and not at the cloudy day.
                      I will - the sun had almost set the time i did my test and there was not very much light (it was actually a sunny day, but the area i shot was already in shadows). Thus i have comparable data only for the first three stops really. If the filter fails after 7 stops, well, then it shouldn't be used on such strong setting, i guess ;-)

                      As far as IR cut goes, based on my brief test the filter indeed seems to cut IR, as there is no change in color regardless of how many stops of reduction is used. At least this applies to the range i was able to test more or less properly.
                      Last edited by Halsu; 02-21-2015, 10:00 AM.
                      http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1402300/
                      http://www.kolumbus.fi/erkki.halkka/cv.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by goodgoings View Post
                        Interesting to read about the SLR Magics new Vari ND. Are there any reports or tests that it cuts the IR pollution on BM cameras?
                        It does not cut IR because it is not an IR cut filter. Also why I suggested both the IR Cut and Vari ND together in my post.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tihon View Post
                          I wouldn't recomend this cheap nd fader. I have the same one and it has a green color cast and x patter after 7stops i think. no ir cut. try to use it with wide lense and not at the cloudy day. You will see how ugly it is. IR cut is must have with blackmagic cameras. Im going to buy hoya pro nd, because they are one of the best for BM, and has good ir cut by default. But i still looking for a good vary nd filter with no iq degradation.

                          https://vimeo.com/55452414 - - really good video about filters and effects to the different sensors. You can see that tiffens with built in ir cut is very good for bm sensors, so i asked you, guys, about the filter in the first post, which seems to be good.

                          Thank you for your replies and sorry for my poor English.
                          That filter test is very old and very bad. Also the filters he tests in that video are not the same ones as these Vari NDs. It's the standard IRND filter Tiffen sells. It's in the video. These are bad for these cameras. Have you seen the ND thread we have here?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tihon View Post
                            ... https://vimeo.com/55452414 - - really good video about filters and effects to the different sensors. You can see that tiffens with built in ir cut is very good for bm sensors, so i asked you, guys, about the filter in the first post, which seems to be good. ...
                            That AbelCine test was shot a long time ago. The Tiffen T1 IR-cut filter adds a strong cyan color cast to footage. Don't use it!

                            Nowadays there are vastly better IR-cut filters appropriate for use with Blackmagic camera sensors. The Hoya UV & IR cut filter is one.

                            Much more info here:
                            http://www.bmcuser.com/showthread.ph...-Report-Thread

                            (Hi, Vic!) :-)
                            www.peterdv.com
                            Blog: http://HereForTheWeather.wordpress.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The abel cine test is totally messed up and not to be trusted. There is a bunch of false information in there, I'm not sure if they screwed up the files or had some early production models of filters or what, but there are some observations in there that just don't align with others experiences with the same gear.

                              The Tiffen T1 adds a green/slight yellow cast, not cyan, at least the two copies I have tested do (I keep a T1 around as a backup). In the Abel Cine test they present a very mild colour cast, but in my experience it needs around a -2 green or -3 green to balance the cast. Fairly easily corrected in post (or in camera if you like to use colour filters or have WB adjust settings, such as GH series), but let's be honest: it's a bit annoying. IR cut performance is good on the T1, but the colour cast makes it inconvenient. Hoya is king of the castle right now as it just works, no fiddling.

                              And to further support Vic's point: unless a filter has IR cut for below 400nm (ish) and above 700nm (ish), you will be getting IR pollution, no way around it. Even if you think you aren't seeing it, it's there. You WILL inevitably find yourself in a more extreme IR pollution scenario and it will poop all over your image and you'll wish you had just kept IR cut on there. This is not just some hollow warning, this is a lesson learned by many of us the hard way. But you can only lead the horse to water.
                              Last edited by JuMo; 02-21-2015, 02:51 PM.

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