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Getting Pocket 4k to (mostly) match Arri Log C Rec 709

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  • #16
    Off topic slightly but I need to get in the habit of using one node for each operation. I will totally put up one correction node then freestyle a bunch of stuff to find a look I like, but then I can't recreate other than copying the node, because I don't know everything I did. Also it would be cool if a lut could be reversed back to the node tree that created it for further tweaking.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by keithlango View Post
      Lots of Hue vs hue
      There's your first problem XD

      Hue vs hue is a very messy road to go down. I've only ever used it when nothing else worked in very specific, difficult situations. If you want a shift in color towards a direction, use the wheels

      Originally posted by John Brawley View Post
      One colourist I worked with a fair bit only ever seemed to use one mode and did everything off the desk. He was so fast I could barely finish asking for what I wanted and it was done.

      This guy seemed to only ever use one mode most of the time.
      If the footage is simple enough, that's all you need sometimes....sometimes.
      Last edited by GeranSimpson; 08-09-2019, 08:51 AM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by GeranSimpson View Post

        If the footage is simple enough, that's all you need sometimes....sometimes.
        Sure. Or the world class colorist I linked doesn't need to more than 1 node most of the time. That was my point. Some colourists have a many node workflow, some work with one.

        This was my experience working on the last series I did for Fox.

        JB

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        • #19
          Originally posted by John Brawley View Post
          Sure. Or the world class colorist I linked doesn't need to more than 1 node most of the time. That was my point. Some colourists have a many node workflow, some work with one.

          This was my experience working on the last series I did for Fox.

          JB
          It’s highly likely that the “one node” was a compound with a complex look that he adjusted from the outside.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by GeranSimpson View Post
            It’s highly likely that the “one node” was a compound with a complex look that he adjusted from the outside.

            I'm sure you're right.

            i'm just a guy that knows nothing at all posting in a thread I know nothing about.

            Carry on.

            JB

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            • #21
              Lol.
              Last edited by GeranSimpson; 08-09-2019, 12:21 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by GeranSimpson View Post
                There's your first problem XD

                Hue vs hue is a very messy road to go down. I've only ever used it when nothing else worked in very specific, difficult situations. If you want a shift in color towards a direction, use the wheels
                .
                Interesting.
                I'll give the wheels a spin ( )

                Hah. Anyhow, I'll still have to do a bunch of discreet operations because the only way to limit wheel influence to specific hues is to use qualifiers. So still a lot of nodes. Perhaps not as many as before in total if they're that much more effective at the task at hand, negating the need for additional bits and bobs. Either way, thanks for the suggestion. I'll see how it work for me.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by keithlango View Post
                  Interesting.
                  I'll give the wheels a spin ( )

                  Hah. Anyhow, I'll still have to do a bunch of discreet operations because the only way to limit wheel influence to specific hues is to use qualifiers. So still a lot of nodes. Perhaps not as many as before in total if they're that much more effective at the task at hand, negating the need for additional bits and bobs. Either way, thanks for the suggestion. I'll see how it work for me.
                  Yup, qualifiers are the key (badum ts). You typically separate into primary and secondary corrections. Primary being your black level, sat, contrast, brightness etc and secondaries being your qualifiers and any creative adjustments. Qualifying skin for adjustment always happens after the primary color. Matching two different cameras with a lut can be difficult, it's much, much easier to just match them from scratch, and match the final look. Don't try to match log conversion to log conversion. It's not going to work the same way in a different scene so it's kind of a waste of time.

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