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  • BRAW not in NETFLIX Partnership Program

    With a pre-production effort on the way to join the NETFLIX partnership program, we are looking at using our URSA UMP G2 cameras to make the movie. It just make sense for us since we already have all the gear and BMD UMP G2 cameras. Upon reviewing the allowable requirements for using BMD UMP cameras (see link below), it does not have BRAW listed. Only CDNG and Pro-res. Well, we don't have CDNG on the G2 so we might settle on Pro-res. This is their latest update and I hope they will add BRAW in the list soon. I wonder if BMD has the word out to Netflix on their new BRAW codec.

    https://drive.google.com/drive/folde...Ey32wczeMeuW_8

    If anyone here has any info on BRAW for Netflix, please chime in. Thanks!

  • #2
    Shoot in braw. Do what you need to do then transcode to prores

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    • #3
      Originally posted by j_walk83 View Post
      Shoot in braw. Do what you need to do then transcode to prores
      That's not how Netflix works. They tell you exactly what camera, codec, etc you can use to shoot the movie that they are partnering with. Right now, you can only use the Ursa Mini Pro 4.6K and shoot in CDNG or Pro-res, specifically CDNG 3:1 or Prores XQ only (see the spec on the link). No transcoding permitted. In post, you can only transform to an ACES workflow using Resolve. We will shoot in Pro-res XQ. But it would have been nice if BRAW was in their list.
      Last edited by EYu; 07-16-2019, 11:37 PM.

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      • #4
        Then foook Netflix.

        On a serious note, I could see them add it in the future, it may help if people reach out to them about Braw, did you get in contact with someone from responsible departments at Netflix?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by stip View Post
          Then foook Netflix.

          On a serious note, I could see them add it in the future, it may help if people reach out to them about Braw, did you get in contact with someone from responsible departments at Netflix?
          I mentioned it to our project lead. This is our first encounter with Netflix so we are threading cautiously. If you are not using their partnering service and going through third party distribution channel, this does not apply.

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          • #6
            When they began insisting on 4K they never balked at footage from the Alexa which at the time was 2.7K?? or something close. It's a guideline not an absolute. If you make some good film I think you'll be fine.
            Last edited by Marshall Harrington; 07-17-2019, 03:40 PM.

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            • #7
              You may be reading into the display graphic too much.

              Here is a breakdown of requirements from their list. Notice the abbreviation "etc." after all the other raw formats. And if they are allowing XAVC in there, I'm sure they allow Braw or ProresRAW

              Capture Requirements:

              Capture Format
              RAW (Sony RAW, REDCODE, Arriraw etc.)
              COMPRESSED (XAVC, ProRes, or other I-Frame capable formats)
              Minimum of 16-bit Linear or 10-bit Log processing
              Minimum data-rate of Bitrate of 240 Mbps at 23.98 fps

              https://partnerhelp.netflixstudios.c...-Image-Capture
              Vimeo.com/dropbars

              https://www.instagram.com/cook_it_off/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Marshall Harrington View Post
                When they began insisting on 4K they never balked at footage from the Alexa which at the time was 2.7K?? or something close. It's a guideline not an absolute. If you make some good film I think you'll be fine.
                There is a distinction between what Netflix will buy from a third party producer/distro (ie: pretty much anything their algos say there's an audience for) and what they require their original Netflix content to shoot. Usually the dividing line is this: if Netflix is giving you ANY money for production, then you play by their rules of codecs, cameras, resolution, etc. But if they're licensing an already completed production then shoot what you want.

                For the producer the difference is meaningful: one allows you to say "It's on Netflix", the other allows you to say "It's a Netflix original". And Netflix will usually push their original content into people's feeds/home page. Not to mention they're helping to foot the bill for actual production, which is no small thing in this world.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by keithlango View Post
                  Usually the dividing line is this: if Netflix is giving you ANY money for production, then you play by their rules of codecs, cameras, resolution, etc. But if they're licensing an already completed production then shoot what you want.
                  .
                  This.
                  Hence what I said above if you read my earlier post. You can complete your film however you want in any camera or resolution, go through a distribution, and have Netflix pick up and license it from a distribution channel. The rules don't apply. Otherwise, if you are partnering with them (they give you money, people, and run the production), then the requirements apply - play by their rules. That's when the specific requirements like camera and format applies. BTW, for documentary, 80% of the capture has to be on the required camera and codec, 20% can be anything else. For non-fiction, 90% / 10% is the rule.
                  Last edited by EYu; 07-17-2019, 08:42 PM.

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                  • #10
                    I wouldn't speculate, I'm sure if you get closer to production you'll be in contact with someone at Netflix. Perhaps prepare a test of ProRes vs Braw through their workflow and have them evaluate. There is a lot of slow adoption. Resolve is completely approved so I cant imagine not approving the codec that allows most flexibility. They might require q0 or c3, but who knows 4:1 cdng appears to have been accepted before.

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                    • #11
                      I love how exact the word exactly is especially when used in a sentence with the word etc.

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                      • #12
                        That's why I kept my OG 4.6K.

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                        • #13
                          This is a GUIDE for Netflix Original content.

                          Netflix will negotiate on most things, even if it's Netflix Original.

                          Mostly they care about resolution, colour sampling and bit depth. BRAW ticks all their boxes.

                          I was in the process of negotiating for a Netflix original show that I'm no longer attached to. BRAW wouldn't be a problem.

                          Weirdly, HDE (Arri) is considered an issue at the moment by some of the studios. They just need to feel they are part of the discussion and each show is done based on it's own merits.Unlike my experiences in Network TV, the streamers are more likely to have a discussion for creative choices on things like camera platforms and aspect ratios.

                          The last networks I worked for actively will not let you shoot anything but ProRes and frame for 1.78. The streamers (like Netflix) and much more creative friendly.

                          JB

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                          • #14
                            BRAW should tick all their boxes. I hope they update their guide soon.

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