Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

White Balance BMPCC

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • White Balance BMPCC

    Hi All,

    This may be a very noob question but I just got my BMPCC and I was wondering how you all are doing white balance, is there a way to set it automatically, on my dads GH4 it can auto set is there anything similar, if not what are some guidelines to white balance on the camera? Also how do I set white balance with a grey card etc? Sorry for the questions but just wondering.

    Thanks

    Jake

  • #2
    Youtube is your friend
    http://www.erichasso.com/
    http://www.thesuspenseofdisbelief.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      No auto White ballance. This is. Cinema camera not a Point and shoot. No need for a Grey card. You should make your self familiar with kelvin temperature scale and lern to judge it approximately. Final touches in post. If shooting raw, it doesn't really matter, you do it all in post.
      https://vimeo.com/obiectivstudio

      Comment


      • #4
        If you have an iPhone, this app, which is free, we will give you a kelvin reading:

        Pocket Light Meter by Nuwaste studios
        https://appsto.re/us/PaeWw.i

        Comment


        • #5
          I got the app but I didn't find any Kelvin metering, are you sure man?

          Comment


          • #6
            There's no need to get that far into it - It's not rocket surgery. If you blow the white balance shooting ProRes you can still fix it in post without a huge hit in IQ. There aren't even that many kelvin settings so there's no need to be exact.

            Comment


            • #7
              yeah, I shoot prores all the time and usually just have the wb set to 5600 and then correct for it in post. I only once or twice ran into such extreme lighting conditions that I had to adjust the wb while shooting.
              Vimeo profile
              VFX Showreel
              IMDB

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the responses guys, much appreciated will check out the app too.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have this app and you need to be on iOS 8 and upgrade the app as well. I think it WB reading is pretty good with the app. I'm not sure why sekonic can't do this with their light meters...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gj91 View Post
                    I have this app and you need to be on iOS 8 and upgrade the app as well. I think it WB reading is pretty good with the app. I'm not sure why sekonic can't do this with their light meters...
                    A light meter measures light, not color. If you would like to have a color meter, Sekonic has this model, which goes from 2,300k to 20,000K.
                    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search...rch=yes&sts=pi

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Max Minoia View Post
                      I got the app but I didn't find any Kelvin metering, are you sure man?
                      I've been using this app for a bit and just noticed they added this WB thing. No idea when they did but seems to work ok.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I shot film for 40 years before any kind of video. In film there are only two choices, 5600/daylight - and 3200/tungsten - the telecine colorist at the lab would then dial in the correct color balance, or work to timing lights provided by me. BTW, home tungsten lights are around 2800, but easily correctable.

                        I shoot ProRes in film mode with the Pocket and have reverted to that way of working - although now I'm the colorist of course. Occasionally I'll tweak the camera's kelvin some for fluorescents (I did that in film too with filtration on lights or camera), but not often.

                        Perhaps in the category of "too much information", kelvin is a scientific term for the temperature of a "black body" heated (like a piece of coal), referring to how red, orange, white or blue it gets as the temperature increases. This tidbit can be useful to know if you have trouble remembering the meaning of the numbers.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jakesaunders27 View Post
                          Hi All,

                          This may be a very noob question but I just got my BMPCC and I was wondering how you all are doing white balance, is there a way to set it automatically, on my dads GH4 it can auto set is there anything similar, if not what are some guidelines to white balance on the camera? Also how do I set white balance with a grey card etc? Sorry for the questions but just wondering.

                          Thanks

                          Jake
                          I feel your pain. I started a thread about this very topic a few weeks ago.


                          It was interesting. I didn't think it was a controversial request but for some reason some people don't want a simple feature found in entry level DSLRs selling for $300.

                          Originally posted by Mac View Post
                          Perhaps in the category of "too much information", kelvin is a scientific term for the temperature of a "black body" heated (like a piece of coal), referring to how red, orange, white or blue it gets as the temperature increases. This tidbit can be useful to know if you have trouble remembering the meaning of the numbers.
                          Actually it is the opposite of science. Higher Kelvin is not "cooler" in science. A blue star is a lot warmer than a red star.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think the white balance in the app is new. I think you can also calibrate it to a color meter. Seems to work well though… certainly, the price is right.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              "The Kelvin scale is named after the Belfast-born, Glasgow University engineer and physicist William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin (1824–1907), who wrote of the need for an "absolute thermometric scale". Unlike the degree Fahrenheit and degree Celsius, the kelvin is not referred to or typeset as a degree. The kelvin is the primary unit of measurement in the physical sciences, but is often used in conjunction with the degree Celsius, which has the same magnitude. Subtracting 273.16 K from the temperature of the triple point of water (0.01 C) makes absolute zero (0 K) equivalent to −273.15 C (−459.67 F)."

                              I only know what I read....

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X