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  • Rolling Shutter Test

    There's been a lot of talk about rolling shutter artefacts on the BMCC but no one seems to have demonstrated how problematic it could be.

    Would it be possible for someone with the camera to film some naked and handheld BMCC with vertical lines in b/g on something like a 50mm lens?

    I'm not looking for charts or scientific comparisons or even super fast whip pans but a real world test of things we may all be shooting soon.

    For me this info would help decide if I switch to the MFT mount - ie: if IS is going to be vital for handheld work on the BMCC.

    Maybe someone has already posted about this and I'm not aware of it but otherwise if someone could oblige I (and I'm sure others) would be hugely grateful.

    Thanks M

  • #2
    Yeah, I'd like to actually see a test!

    It keeps getting mentioned but I hardly see any in any of the videos that are posted, even John Brawley's few videos which have some moderate movement in them.

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    • #3
      Some one maybe PB, cant remember, had a shot of a underground train leaving the station. about 1/4 of a second.

      Showed skew.

      Overall Ive done loads of carmount/steadicam with my 5d so..

      S

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      • #4
        No one wants to be the the first to test something that will go viral with their name attached that MIGHT break the magic spell of a camera that hasn't gotten out of the gate yet. Whether its similar to the 5D or better, people will pick it apart to death. Bloggers with test cameras don't want to destroy their relationship with companies with a test video that MIGHT cause a commotion whether that commotion is warranted or not. Its a no win. Personally,John Brawleys short film footage is all I need to know about the camera.

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        • #5
          I'll shoot some 50mm handheld tomorrow when I get the camera.
          -Michael Beck

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          • #6
            Okay, here we go.

            First one is on a slider, second one is on a tripod.
            24p, ProRes/film, 180 deg shutter, Samyang 35mm

            I think it is not as bad as in the DSLRs, and to be honest, in my whole life as a DP, I newer whipped my camera around like that.





            Blog: http://frankglencairn.wordpress.com/

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            • #7
              It is more obvious than I was hoping. Still workable though. Seems better in someways that the dslrs.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cineman View Post
                It is more obvious than I was hoping. Still workable though. Seems better in someways that the dslrs.
                I have not worked on just a few lower-end pro cameras, but I thought learning how to work with the limitations of any camera was what you did (not against them). There is nothing I've worked on which would look "good" in those test shots either. Has anyone?

                Thanks Frank Glencairn for the test. I agree and I am confused why folk would be moving a camera around fast and actually expect it to "follow" perfectly. There was one part where Frank was panning right relatively slowly across the buildings (I believe on tripod) and I didn't like the look of that though.

                It irks me a bit that the off the cuff PB comment about rolling shutter had one Vimeo user say "that's it I am not buying this camera".
                Last edited by Steve4505; 09-09-2012, 08:04 AM.

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                • #9
                  This may or may not be what Frank has done, but note below what Barry Green requested concerning rolling shutter skew artifact testing. Seems like a pretty straight-forward test. Has anyone done it?


                  Originally posted by Barry Green View Post
                  The "wiggle" test is pointless and outdated. There is a very simple easy and truly scientific test possible. Just level the camera and shoot a vertical stripe, panning past it in both directions. Supply two frames back-to-back. From that we can calculate exactly what the rolling shutter is, and you don't need to do side-by-side or multiple cameras simultaneously and you don't need to worry about field of view or panning rate or anything. Sure wish someone would do this, so we could answer this question definitively once and for all.
                  Last edited by Peter J. DeCrescenzo; 09-09-2012, 12:29 PM.
                  www.peterdv.com
                  Blog: http://HereForTheWeather.wordpress.com

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                  • #10
                    Better than I expected to be true! That works for me! It's more than ok for a camera under 5k!
                    Jorge De Silva - Photography & Filmmaking
                    Personal Quote: "We should always learn from others! Life always teaches us something! Sharing is the key!"
                    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1843499/

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                    • #11
                      Yeah, I was hoping for better, but I can't complain! It is absolutely not bad enough to be a major problem.
                      -Michael Beck

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Steve4505 View Post
                        I have not worked on just a few lower-end pro cameras, but I thought learning how to work with the limitations of any camera was what you did (not against them). There is nothing I've worked on which would look "good" in those test shots either. Has anyone?

                        Thanks Frank Glencairn for the test. I agree and I am confused why folk would be moving a camera around fast and actually expect it to "follow" perfectly. There was one part where Frank was panning right relatively slowly across the buildings (I believe on tripod) and I didn't like the look of that though.

                        It irks me a bit that the off the cuff PB comment about rolling shutter had one Vimeo user say "that's it I am not buying this camera".
                        I agree with you for the most part but if you have movement in the shot, NOT JUST THE CAMERA MOVING, can cause your shot to look bad or unusable.

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                        • #13
                          Wow! To me that looks pretty bad Frank. The 5D2 and GoPro are worse for sure, but I feel most other CMOS broadcast and DSLR camera's are better.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Frank Glencairn View Post
                            Okay, here we go.

                            First one is on a slider, second one is on a tripod.
                            24p, ProRes/film, 180 deg shutter, Samyang 35mm

                            I think it is not as bad as in the DSLRs, and to be honest, in my whole life as a DP, I newer whipped my camera around like that.











                            How is showing the camera on a footage show the reality of jello in what is from the CEO's own words meant as primarily to be handheld. You said recently that you didn't want to show some handheld footage because it basically sucked. The guy above is right people don't want to be the one that shows what could be a serious negative with this camera. Even your on tripod test looks a little worrying actually. It's important for people to know before they choose what mount, an EF with IS may be the only way to be handheld with this camera.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Maybe they will be able to speed up the refresh rate of the sensor in a firmware update. RED did it with the RED ONE. The RED ONE was really bad at first, and 2 or 3 firmware updates later it was considerably better.

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