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Pool Shark. New footage.

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  • aalleexx
    replied
    what I find most interesting is how filmic this footage looks, very excited

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  • Roman
    replied
    For anyone interested, I'm currently uploading a video I just took right now exhibiting the exact same pattern shown in Pool Shark. I have the same double layered mesh backing on my chair and took some time to really examine it. With my naked eye, it looks EXACTLY the way it does in this video. The main shadows within the mesh are more of a design caused by the way light is filtering through the curved mesh, and inducing shape changes from a perceptual parallax, and the detailed moire pattern is inevitable with fine patterns like this... even to the naked eye.

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  • lsorensen
    replied
    Now that the moire discussion is solved, somebody please point out to me where the aliasing issues are. My contacts must have a built-in AA filter, because I can't spot aliasing anywhere in that sweet looking hipster paradise of an apartment.

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  • Roman
    replied
    Originally posted by Philip Lipetz View Post
    Posted on EOSHD

    Hi everyone, this is my first post but I just had to point out something: I used to have a chair like that. It's not actually moire like what happens with a lot of other DSLR footage that's caused by aliasing. This is actually caused naturally by the fact that you are looking through two layers of mesh. It's imposable for the front mesh the line up exactly with the back mesh so you see a moire pattern.**It's a completely naturally occurring optical effect that you would see with your naked eye. Another way you can tell this is the case is that the pattern doesn't change or move every frame like normal moire caused by aliasing or the simple fact there is no moire anywhere else.

    Thanks!
    I agree, as somebody who has this exact type of chair with 2 layers of mesh, if you look at it from any angle other than straight on, the interference or moire pattern occurs. And this is looking at it up close with the naked eye. It's pretty much impossible not to see moire in this instance. And in the video, it isn't false color being introduced by the moire, but simply the color coming through the mesh itself. When I look at my chair, the 2 layers of mesh exhibiting the moire pattern also reflect the color of the seat coming through just as it appears in the video.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kristoffer Stranden
    replied
    I don't hope any of you are referring to the overlapping patterns moire(the black zebra stripes), but instead, the color moire. One being an optical effect and other being a sensor artifact!

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  • Philip Lipetz
    replied
    Posted on EOSHD

    Hi everyone, this is my first post but I just had to point out something: I used to have a chair like that. It's not actually moire like what happens with a lot of other DSLR footage that's caused by aliasing. This is actually caused naturally by the fact that you are looking through two layers of mesh. It's imposable for the front mesh the line up exactly with the back mesh so you see a moire pattern.**It's a completely naturally occurring optical effect that you would see with your naked eye. Another way you can tell this is the case is that the pattern doesn't change or move every frame like normal moire caused by aliasing or the simple fact there is no moire anywhere else.

    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • nickjbedford
    replied
    This is my guess as to the difference between BMDCC moiré (top) and DSLR line-skipping moiré (bottom, far worse).

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  • nickjbedford
    replied
    Originally posted by John Brawley View Post
    Moire on a 5D is far worse and caused for different reasons than with this camera. The chair was an extreme torture test. Even to the eye you'd get interference.

    JB.
    I didn't even notice it until someone posted about it. Even then, it barely even registers when I watch the scene as I'm focusing on what you and Ben Phelps have shot the scene to direct my attention to.

    And the fact that the hair in the close up doesn't suffer from moiré is evidence to suggest that it takes a very fine frequency to cause moiré in the camera (smaller than the bayer RGBG pixel groups themselves). Hair on a 60D or 5D causes moiré without effort.

    Leave a comment:


  • John Brawley
    replied
    Moire on a 5D is far worse and caused for different reasons than with this camera. The chair was an extreme torture test. Even to the eye you'd get interference.

    JB.

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  • John Brawley
    replied
    Originally posted by dvbrother View Post
    Right at about :39, the hue/lightness of the blue felt on the pool table and the green of the 14 Ball (on the right) shifts in one frame's time. Careful inspection also shows the shadow areas at the bottom of the frame also change tint at the same time. This is very similar to a blue shift problem the GH1 has. On the GH1, in the space of one frame, blues would shift their value, with no seeming cause. I don't think it was ever solved in the GH1, but the GH2 does not exhibit this problem.
    I'm 99% sure it's not on the original. I'll redo the upload tomorrow.

    JB.

    Leave a comment:


  • vegetableman
    replied
    Originally posted by lsorensen View Post
    We have just been delivered an amazing unbelievable camera for $3000 yet I see people complaining about a little moire on a goddamn fiber mesh chair in the back of the scene. This culture of pixel peepers is disturbing, to say the least. Clients and Viewers DO NOT play "Where's Waldo" when it comes to slight moire and aliasing like you people do. BM probably put countless days/nights of work into this project to deliver us the ability to achieve an image that a decade ago would have cost 100x worth of equipment. Cheers BM for your innovation and incredible market disruptor. The big manufactures just crapped their pants.
    i agree.

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  • Roman
    replied
    Originally posted by barant View Post
    Footage is unbelievable! I'm so glad my girlfriend is buying me one! Sorry, had to brag
    Wait... you have a girlfriend? I thought all of us who stalked these forums were single? The more you know...

    Leave a comment:


  • barant
    replied
    Footage is unbelievable! I'm so glad my girlfriend is buying me one! Sorry, had to brag

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  • aelipinski
    replied
    Originally posted by vladnik View Post
    that chair has extremely fine pattern ...
    i don't think that other cameras would give clean image ....
    Very true. Moire increases with increasing object distance and decreasing mesh size. Considering that the object is a distant fine-mesh chair, most video sensors would have trouble sampling such a pattern. Furthermore, a wide angle lens reduces background objects, further shrinking the perceived mesh size.

    A distant fine mesh chair is an extreme case and presents more problems than your typical brick wall or patterned shirt, which my t2i would render into seizure-inducing disco lights.

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  • Macalincag
    replied
    Originally posted by AndrewDeme View Post
    just behind the girls head on the bed
    You sure you talking about the Olympics?

    ...And back on topic.

    Leave a comment:

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