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Any tips on matching two different exposures?

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  • Any tips on matching two different exposures?

    So, long story short, I shot my first wedding last weekend. I had a little fiasco with getting my equipment on time (FedEx misplaced my items) so I was hustling to get my equipment before the wedding.

    I trusted one of my good friends with my b-cam (we used two bmpcc for the shoot), and he was very overexposed. When I try to match it up with my footage I'm a little lost in getting them to look alike. I am using Premiere to edit and color correct, so if someone could give advice for speed grade or premiere that would be helpful. Although, if you have a solution in Resolve I could use that too.

    I'll attach a few screen grabs tonight for you guys to see.

  • #2
    eesh, hopefully they aren't too over exposed. And I'm assuming you shot ProRes as you needed to fill up the card as much as you could.

    Being straightforward, I have to suggest Resolve but it doesn't mean you can't do it in Premiere. Either or, you're gonna need three things, actually 4. Your eyes (2), RGB curves, and vector scopes.

    If you don't know how to use scopes, youtube can help you understand them and how they help you stabilize exposure. In Resolve or any editor, use the curves and drag the point at the top right down. This will lower your highs. Tweak till it matches the other footage, then use scopes to verify what you're seeing is what's actually happening to the footage.
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    • #3
      I should have mentioned- I shot in ProresHQ.

      It's not TOO bad, a little white for my taste but even lowering the brightness helps a bunch. The issue is the colors are way off. Which makes sense with the scopes.

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      • #4
        I have had a few issues with Premiere and grading BM footage, it introduced banding and looked pretty bad. I got good results in Resolve doing the same thing but they may have improved this in newer versions of Premiere. I don't think the Birghtness effect is they way forward, like using a hammer to fix a watch. Try the levels in the fast colour corrector, use the gamma, black and white levels for starters.

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        • #5
          https://www.video2brain.com/en/lesso...lor-correction
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          • #6
            kw1.jpgMONO-003.00_04_05_10.Still002.jpg

            Not sure if this can be saved...They are just JPEGs. The one you can see is obviously overexposed compared to the other. Ive moved to resolve to try there, so if anybody has any tips I would greatly appreciate it!

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            • #7
              Use resolve, not Premiere

              Open the waveform and pick a reference point, use the gain control to match.


              I have pulled back a lot from ProResHQ - as long as its under clipping, it should be ok.
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              • #8
                pretty sure that first frame grab is beyond clipping. I highly doubt you'll be able to recover anything from that with a ProRes file. Raw is a different story...
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