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Thefilmaddict
05-09-2014, 12:45 PM
I have to do a simple interview with two cameras. The subject will be looking slightly off camera at the interviewer. One shot will be tight. The other shot will be a medium shot. I am trying to decide where to put each camera. I m trying to make the cut between these two angles pretty seamless and I am hoping the eye line won't be that drastically different between the two.

So in a room with a subject, an interviewer and 2 cameras on the the subject (one tight and one medium or medium wide), where do you put each camera?

Michael Bergstrom
05-09-2014, 01:23 PM
Right next to each other. Butt those tripods so close they are overlapping...

spinshot
05-09-2014, 01:31 PM
have the interviewer sit close to the camera without getting in the shot. lenses at eye level. use a non swiveling chair for the talent.

harrisoncj
05-09-2014, 05:25 PM
Make sure that the interview subject is looking the same direction in each shot. If you put him on the right side of the frame and he's looking to the left side of frame, make sure he's looking right to left in the second camera.

stier
05-09-2014, 05:37 PM
1. Follow the 180 degree rule: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/180-degree_rule
2. Place tight shot around eye level, wide slightly lower (breast), but go creative with the angles. Not too much though, so keep noses in their owner's faces. Few people look good enough for profile shots.
3. Frame with 'Rule of Thirds' in mind. A very close up could be styled more lively, even wildly with refocusing and reframing action.

Go for at least 2 light sources. Window from somewhere behind, soft key on the opposite. Ideally hairlight at 120h and 15v degree.
HF!

Thefilmaddict
05-09-2014, 09:04 PM
Which camera is closer to the subject -- ms or cu?

spinshot
05-09-2014, 09:44 PM
depends on your focal lengths, but usually they are about the same distance

J.F.R.
05-10-2014, 09:43 PM
I have to do a simple interview with two cameras. The subject will be looking slightly off camera at the interviewer. One shot will be tight. The other shot will be a medium shot. I am trying to decide where to put each camera. I m trying to make the cut between these two angles pretty seamless and I am hoping the eye line won't be that drastically different between the two.

So in a room with a subject, an interviewer and 2 cameras on the the subject (one tight and one medium or medium wide), where do you put each camera?

Will there be BRoll? If there is it doesn't really matter.... Any good editor will pick the best shots and then cut away if possible, even introducing L cuts to keep the audio on the interview as well. Finally you can do this with one camera. I've asked several questions before and just move the camera, when you ask other ones. 2 cameras are not needed for interview.

Matt_Rozier
05-11-2014, 11:33 AM
Hey there, if you're asking which of the cameras to place closer to the eyeline of the interviewee, whether the camera closer to the 'line' between interviewee and interviewer should be the CU or MS, it's totally a matter of taste. If possible it's always handy to have the CU closer to the eyeline, as for example when shooting drama, we jump to a CU when we want to connect emotionally with the subject. And you'll find that cutting to a CU with an eyeline which looks closer to the lens tends to heighten that connection. Saying that though, it's a rule that can be broken successfully very easily, and you may find other technical reasons why doing that may be tricky. Perhaps lens or camera availability, perhaps your lighting set up, perhaps your location - so to sum up, CU closer to the eyeline though either way will work just fine :)

spinshot
05-11-2014, 12:17 PM
it's a rule that can be broken successfully very easily, and you may find other technical reasons why doing that may be tricky.

yes, we have to do the opposite (CU furthest from cam) if the backdrop or set is not wide enough. the closer we place the medium shot to the eyeline, the less area is needed to cover the background.

here is an interview we did showing exactly that. (sony f3 and sony primes)

go to about 0:40 in the interview


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxnm7nNaXOY

Michael Carter
05-13-2014, 04:51 PM
Or shoot 4K and reframe your closeups. This is really going to be the go-to for a lot of folks.