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Joechiazza
03-07-2014, 01:03 PM
Hey guys, how would you go about lighting this scene. I would love for the city in the background to not be blown out. I also don't want this to be super flat lighting because it is a drama. This is my first time lighting a scene like this. I will be shooting in 2.5k raw.

In my kit i have

2 lowel DPs
2 Lowel Omnis
1 Lowel Tota
1 Lowel Pro
1 Cheap 500w LED light
I have daylight gels for all of them. Let me know what you think. If you can think of any interesting camera angels I should try that would be helpful too. Thanks!!!

7537

7538

rze
03-07-2014, 05:51 PM
I would say your light kit is not optimal for that set up. It also depends on the look that you are going for. I would say you should do more with natural light and with a little fill. Once you gel those lights plus put any diffusion (which will be needed since those are all open face fixtures) they will barely make a difference. If you want dramatic perhaps closer to silhouettes might be cool.

vicharris
03-07-2014, 10:32 PM
Yeah, as soon as you add full CTB on those lights, you just reduced their power by 50%

Maybe some Flos just camera right with 5600 bulbs in em but you'll never get to where you want to be in the wides. CU, no problem though.

Possibly try a silver reflector, using the sunlight if you have it on the day, bouncing back in. I don't know but you need a lot more power. I used 3, 2Ks for something like this with full CTBs on em and it barely worked.

pacman829
03-07-2014, 11:07 PM
If you dont have a budget for brighter daylight balanced lights, I'd just say to invest in a couple Large reflectors (silver, but the kind with beads that spread out light a bit more evenly) and just go with that for key/fill

Should be able to make it so your background isnt too far gone

Bob Loblaw
03-08-2014, 12:55 AM
Use ND gels on the windows. You can get it in large rolls, and you can easily cover those windows with it. I've also heard that a net cloth will cut down the daylight by a stop or two, and will also be invisible on camera, but I've never tried it. Just do something with the windows, because that light kit will not work well when competing with the sun.

Also, proper lighting will be far more important than seeing the city in the background. If you can't get gels, and can't compete with the sun's brightness, then throw tracing paper on the windows. It will create an illusion that the sunlight is blowing out the windows without anything actually being blown out. It will also cut the unruly sunlight down by quite a bit. This is a little trick that Roger Deakins uses sometimes. You can see this trick in action here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIbrWQ5hzLg

scorsesefan
03-08-2014, 06:03 PM
As RZE said it depends what the scene/characters are about. If, for example, you were trying to add a little mystery or mood to the scene you can silhouette the actors and just add fill to your liking. If it's supposed to be a boring, generic meeting in a boring office with flat lighting so be it. Check out the original "Wall Street" (which is a drama) and you'll see the lighting in Charlie Sheen's office is pretty flat and boring. The best advice I can give is to really think about what the scene is about and then design you're lighting/cinematography around that.

Howie Roll
03-11-2014, 05:22 AM
What is the scene, what's the proposed blocking, what does your shot list look like, how long is the scene, one page or six? Shooting toward the window is a high dynamic range shot while the reverse is the opposite. I'd start by replacing all the practicals with high cri fluorescent cfls or tubes, that will take care of a lot of the fill. The window is the motivated light source so you'd key from that direction, maybe the DPs with 3/4 to full ctb hanging from drop ceiling hangers. ND is a great idea but difficult to do properly, simple window screen is great as a low cost scrim but you're going to need your climbing harness. You could also shoot at dawn or dusk and be quick about it. Without some idea of what you're trying to accomplish it's all just darts. Good Luck.

Michael Carter
03-11-2014, 01:35 PM
That's not a huge ND job at all. Close the blinds on the right (like the ones on the left) for shots with windows in view. Gives you a nice composition of 2 tall rectangles.

Open the side blinds when the windows aren't in the shot. Rent a 1.2k HMI or get your hands on a few 4-bank flos to at least get your levels up.

Yep, NDs on those tungstens is going to make them very weak, you'll need all of them and it's going to be a bitch of resets with all those hot lights going.

But definitely consider sunrise/sunset... or a night scene.

I don't think there's any way to net those windows, and net's a bitch - it has to be TIGHT and camera movement can still give you moire at angles.

Michael Bergstrom
03-12-2014, 01:53 PM
Yes, that's a tiny gel job. Instead of blasting light into that tiny room with the package you have, I would see if you could find some Lee 208 or 207 which is ND6 or 3 with CTO built in. Gel the windows move your lights in and call it a day.

MiguelFranco
03-13-2014, 08:16 AM
Have you got budget for RoscoVIEW (http://www.rosco.com/FTVP/roscoview.cfm)? Seems it could solve your problem

vicharris
03-13-2014, 09:19 AM
Some of you guys keep saying to gel the windows. You have to know this isn't that easy. Any small little air pocket will be visible. Unless you've done it a few times are are proficient at it, I would not suggest doing such a large job for the first time. One window. sure. But three floor to ceiling windows?

markmwilliams
03-13-2014, 09:36 AM
I would also think about what is motivating the light falling on your actors? - it's all very well blasting light at them but where is it coming from - ceiling lights, another window, practicals?

Also hiring lights is normally not too expensive and in terms of time and labour it could be far more time and cost effective than trying to ND the windows or set up large silver reflectors.

Bob Loblaw
03-14-2014, 07:03 AM
Some of you guys keep saying to gel the windows. You have to know this isn't that easy. Any small little air pocket will be visible. Unless you've done it a few times are are proficient at it, I would not suggest doing such a large job for the first time. One window. sure. But three floor to ceiling windows?

I've never had any issues taping gels on windows. It's a pretty straightforward task to do, like hanging a movie poster, and it only take a few minutes. I've never had a gel stick to the window and cause an air pocket before, but if it did I would just smooth it out with my hand, I can't see it being a big deal that couldn't be fixed in a matter of seconds.

I personally get a bit OCD when hanging gels inside of a window instead of outside, but I've seen grips hang them very quick & sloppy and it still works.

MiguelFranco
03-14-2014, 07:17 AM
I've never had any issues taping gels on windows. It's a pretty straightforward task to do, like hanging a movie poster, and it only take a few minutes. I've never had a gel stick to the window and cause an air pocket before, but if it did I would just smooth it out with my hand, I can't see it being a big deal that couldn't be fixed in a matter of seconds.

I personally get a bit OCD when hanging gels inside of a window instead of outside, but I've seen grips hang them very quick & sloppy and it still works.

Yeah, haven't had any problems as well.

robmneilson
03-14-2014, 03:17 PM
In the past we have had some shots where we could not tape the gels without seeing that there is gaff holding them up. So we sprayed down the windows with water, then stuck on the gels and used a small shower squeegee to make the water between the gel and window look even. It's a bit tricky sometimes, but it works great.

Michael Bergstrom
03-14-2014, 03:21 PM
cut gel roughly to shape. with your water put a little sprite or dish soap in it, squeegee the window with mixture, put gel on, cut to shape, squeegee again, very fast and looks great. Never have had a bubble. For quick and dirty where I had shades or blinds in front of it, I've cut gel to shape and then used snot tape to hold it.

robmneilson
03-14-2014, 03:26 PM
Ah thanks Michael, I forgot to mention that the water needs to be soapy! I never tried Sprite though, that sounds like it could come in handy in a pinch. Plus now we have something for the PA's to drink while they fan me with the oversized palm frond.

PaPa
03-16-2014, 10:39 AM
I think your best bet is some reflectors, mirros, bounce boards. The more you ND down your windows, the less light you'll have inside that's daylight to bounce from. That is, if your budget does not allow for proper lighting inside.

JLdp
03-16-2014, 10:58 AM
ND9 gel the windows or rent 1.2 or 1.8 HMIs.
your lights alone wont cut it if you want to have an exposure outside, but work with the window light too, embrace what its already doing as either a key or a fill.