PDA

View Full Version : Importance of using viewfinder with dominant eye



Gobhoblin
12-12-2013, 11:52 AM
I'm currently setting up a LCDVF for my camera, and I have recently developed an astigmatism in my right eye (which is dominant). I'm able to focus with it, but my left eye is functioning perfectly, so I'd rather use that.

What is it exactly that I will be missing when using my non-dominant eye?

There is, of course, the issue of shifting perspective when opening my right eye whilst having my left on the viewfinder, which in certain circumstances probably will be somewhat problematic, but are there other effects?

razz16mm
12-12-2013, 02:25 PM
Some EVF's have threaded eye pieces that let you install a corrective lens, like the Small HD Dp-4. Don't know if you can do the same with clip on LCDVF's, but might be worth looking into.

Dominant eye issues shouldn't make much difference unless both eyes are open. The brain adapts pretty easily.

I used to shoot ENG with both eyes open, one on the EVF and one for checking action outside the frame. But the dominant eye was on the EVF.
Neat trick to try for action shooting is to match the lens focal length so the field of view and image scale in the EVF is matches your off eye for shooting both eyes open.

Gobhoblin
12-12-2013, 04:26 PM
Some EVF's have threaded eye pieces that let you install a corrective lens, like the Small HD Dp-4. Don't know if you can do the same with clip on LCDVF's, but might be worth looking into.

Astigmatism is a bit more complex than that. You would have to make hundreds of different kinds of corrective lenses. Corrective sets are made for simple issues like myopia and hyperopia.


Dominant eye issues shouldn't make much difference unless both eyes are open. The brain adapts pretty easily.

Well, yes, but is there much to adapt to, really? Other than the fact that the perspective will be off when having both eyes open? I've tried searching for it, and some people seems to find it incredibly important that one use the dominant eye, but there really are nobody mentioning why that is.

It's strange really, I would think there would be more information on the subject.

Jon
12-12-2013, 04:43 PM
Framing and focus is the same no matter which eye you use in the viewfinder.

Michael Carter
12-12-2013, 07:59 PM
The issue is more of brain-wiring. My dominant eye is the right... to close just my right and use my left, seems like I have to twist my whole face up. It's very difficult and unnatural.

I had a wicked eye infection a few years ago and actually taped my eye closed with a band-aid to use a VF with my "wrong" eye. But this is likely something that varies from person to person. And I'd bet some bucks it's something you can re-wire with enough persistence. Maybe the over-40 crowd remembers those "lazy eye" PSA's from the 60's and 70's?

I have terrible astigmatism... I can clearly see two moons at night (astigmatism focus multiple images on your optic nerves or whatever). But it takes a lot of contrast to really "see" it (moon at night, etc) and it's not a focusing problem for me. I think your brain gets used to it and blanks it out. Driving at night when very tired - now that sucks. too many street lights!

razz16mm
12-12-2013, 11:58 PM
Astigmatism is a bit more complex than that. You would have to make hundreds of different kinds of corrective lenses. Corrective sets are made for simple issues like myopia and hyperopia.



Well, yes, but is there much to adapt to, really? Other than the fact that the perspective will be off when having both eyes open? I've tried searching for it, and some people seems to find it incredibly important that one use the dominant eye, but there really are nobody mentioning why that is.

It's strange really, I would think there would be more information on the subject.

Can't say about others, but for me if both eyes are open but seeing substantially different views, like lens focal length not matching 1:1 with your eyes in the EVF view, what your brain will focus on is the dominant eye view.

John Brawley
12-13-2013, 03:53 AM
There is evidence that handedness affects visual perception. Try google. Or general books on visual perception.

Most of the time the issue is that VFs are set up to have the EVF on the camera left side. Operating with your left eye generally means that you can't "look around" with your other eye to see what's outside your frame. You're vision is masked by the camera.

I almost always operate with both eyes open. It means I can make eye contact with boom swingers or 1st ACs and also helps when trying to time camera moves with action beginning out of frame. It also will greatly reduce eye strain and headaches that come from closing one eye all day.

JB.

Deggen
12-13-2013, 06:12 AM
I'm pretty sure astigmatism is sort of like having an anamorphic lens on your eye. Either the retina or cornea is squished slightly.

So you can only critically focus on either the horizontal or vertical plane at any given time. I have an astigmatic left eye, and on close inspection, my glasses are slightly anamorphic on that side. So I guess what that means for using an EVF is that you wont be able to get sharp focus with that eye, unless you use prescribed astigmatic corrective glasses to align your horizontal and vertical focus planes.

- Darren

Inprogress
02-14-2014, 08:41 AM
The funny thing for me personally. I've always used my right eye when target shooting with a rifle, both eyes open, right eye through the scope.

However, any camera work I do I do with my left eye to the EVF, usually with my right eye open, unless in harsh sunlight.

It is confirmed, I am clinically insane!

Michael Carter
02-14-2014, 09:24 AM
I'm pretty sure astigmatism is sort of like having an anamorphic lens on your eye. Either the retina or cornea is squished slightly.

So you can only critically focus on either the horizontal or vertical plane at any given time. I have an astigmatic left eye, and on close inspection, my glasses are slightly anamorphic on that side. So I guess what that means for using an EVF is that you wont be able to get sharp focus with that eye, unless you use prescribed astigmatic corrective glasses to align your horizontal and vertical focus planes.

- Darren

That's sort-of accurate when describing optical systems with astigmatism. For practical purposes, "You may have difficulty seeing one color against another (contrast) or you may experience distorted images, such as lines which lean to one side. Severe astigmatism can cause double vision."

Thing is, even with crap-ass eye sight, you can get really good focus with a viewfinder or loupe - in my crap-ass eyesight experience. I focus the eyepiece so readout info is crisp; if I really think about it, I can see a ghost image of the readouts that are in the frame edges with black behind them. But my brain has lived with this so long, it only seems to "process" the main image, unless it's very dark out with small light sources (moon in a clear black sky).

Dominant eye issues though - that's a rough one for me. Just can't work with my left eye in the VF. There's a bright side to this though... if you're iffy about a composition, try looking at it with your other eye, you may see what's bugging you.

Also, modern on-set monitors give us another cool compositional tool... many artists use the trick of holding their work to a mirror for a "fresh" look - you really can spot the compositional problems quickly this way. Set one of your function keys to image flip and try it on your next shoot.

seanmclennan
02-14-2014, 02:07 PM
watch for tilt.

I had laser eye surgery and my left eye was 100% perfect, my right had had some healing issues....took a looooooooong time for my right eye to come around. I began shooting with my left eye and found I introduced a tilt into al my shots.