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View Full Version : ideal $1k or less walkaround lens



imdjay
08-07-2012, 10:16 PM
looking to see if anyone has worked with the efs 17-55, sigma 17-50, or tokina 16-50, and knows the throw distances of each.

a "normal" "focal" length for the bmc is about 22mm, so any of the apsc standard zooms will be a decent all around versatile lens.

any thoughts?

nickjbedford
08-08-2012, 02:10 AM
I have the Canon 17-55mm F2.8 IS USM. It's a great lens for a non-L. I'll be using that mostly (and Tokina 11-16) until I rent or buy primes.

It's my only lens on my 60D as I do mostly portraits.

Brian@202020
08-08-2012, 06:35 AM
I have the Sigma 17-50 2.8 EX DC HSM OS. Amazing lens. The "EX Series" is Sigma's equivalent to Canon's "L Series". I've only had it a couple months, but it has quickly become my favorite lens due to it's great optics, range, and versatility. I would highly recommend it. The Sigma in conjunction with my Tokina 11-16 2.8 pretty much covers everything needed on my GH2 for interviews and corporate videos. For the more creative stuff I go with my Nikon primes to get the extra DoF capabilities.

imdjay
08-08-2012, 09:10 AM
question for both of you: what are the throw distances of those lenses? if you can't figure the degrees could you rough it with a tape measure and see how many mm it is from say 1 foot to the edge of infinity?

Brad Ferrell
08-08-2012, 09:41 AM
Take a look at the Tamron 17mm-50mm f2.8 (non VC). It was a favorite over at the DVXUser APS-C forum and it's one of my favorites. Nice and sharp, great contrast, and not too heavy. It also has a nice focus ring, but the throw is short. It's only $500.00 USD.

imdjay
08-08-2012, 11:22 AM
I've owned the tamron and despite its great IQ, the short throw and less than great rings have me avoiding it

aelipinski
08-08-2012, 12:45 PM
looking to see if anyone has worked with the efs 17-55, sigma 17-50, or tokina 16-50, and knows the throw distances of each.

a "normal" "focal" length for the bmc is about 22mm, so any of the apsc standard zooms will be a decent all around versatile lens.

any thoughts?

I own the Sigma which has a very short focus throw. I'd say between 50 - 70 degrees.

Despite the short throw, the ring is very smooth. Much smoother than most Canon rings when switched to MF.

Other than that, the lens is incredible. Great optics, nice build, constant f/2.8.

imdjay
08-08-2012, 01:35 PM
if i were to judge based on these images, it would seem the canon has a slightly longer throw

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-lM8tYpbupMg/TZiCwGxydwI/AAAAAAAAAKU/dnmqFS-0LPg/s1600/Canon+EF-S+17-55mm+f2.8+IS+USM+Lens.png
http://www.ephotozine.com/articles/sigma-17-50mm-f-2-8-ex-dc-os-hsm-15056/images/Sigma175028OS.jpg

Steve Madsen
08-08-2012, 10:18 PM
I dont own the Canon 17-55, but a quick google search suggests 90 deg.

Looks like it'll be a go to for many. James Longley (academy award nominated for the beautiful Iraq in Fragments) has a bit to say about the lens here...

http://www.cinemaeosuser.net/index.php?/topic/58-c300-for-documentary-work/

nickjbedford
08-09-2012, 01:44 AM
Manual focusing during a take is as frustrating as any other photographic autofocus lens.

Only a cinema lens with a proper manual focus mechanism will give you something you can truly work with.

zwarte_kat
08-09-2012, 02:53 AM
I dont own the Canon 17-55, but a quick google search suggests 90 deg.

Looks like it'll be a go to for many. James Longley (academy award nominated for the beautiful Iraq in Fragments) has a bit to say about the lens here...

http://www.cinemaeosuser.net/index.php?/topic/58-c300-for-documentary-work/

The reason James Longley likes the lens is mainly because of it's IS. Do we know yet if IS is supported now or in the future? Because if it isn't, then I don't see a reason to pay for it, unless you want to to use the lens on other systems as well.

Steve Madsen
08-09-2012, 03:01 AM
Only a cinema lens with a proper manual focus mechanism will give you something you can truly work with.

Not just cinema lenses. There are many manual still lenses that'll do the job nicely.

imdjay
08-09-2012, 06:31 PM
Manual focusing during a take is as frustrating as any other photographic autofocus lens.

Only a cinema lens with a proper manual focus mechanism will give you something you can truly work with.


true, but also rhetorical ;)

but also misleading. many do work with photo lenses all the time, myself included. depends on situation and budget.

nickjbedford
08-09-2012, 07:33 PM
true, but also rhetorical ;)

but also misleading. many do work with photo lenses all the time, myself included. depends on situation and budget.

Well, manual focusing without a follow focus anyway :p