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zachariahlewis
01-31-2013, 06:44 PM
Let me know if this has already been discussed, but here we go...

After speaking to my camera dealer, I'm hoping to have my camera in a month or so. I'm going on a trip to India in March to document my father's trip and it's basically going to be a one man show. Shooting, audio, DITing and whatever else. I'm not really worried about anything except the whole DIT process. I have a Retina 15" MBP and my dad has a 2008 15" (black keys) MBP. My question is how do guys think the best capturing workflow would be? I'm assuming USB 3 would be the cheapest / quickest option for transfer. Thunderbolt seems overpriced and unnecessary when I have the option of USB 3. I've guessed that I'll need about 5tb of storage for everything and that's not including backup.

I guess my basic idea was to capture from SSD to an external 2.5" hard drive bus powered USB 3 Drive. Once the SSD has been dumped, clear the SSD and then it would go back to the cam. And then at the end of the day, I could clear the 2.5" HDs to a wall powered 3.5" "master" drives. That way, If I don't have access to power, I can work off of battery until the end of the day. Does that make sense?


My projected equipment list will be:

BMCC
Canon t3i
Retina 15" MBP
2008 15" MBP
480gb OCZ Vertex 3
240gb OCZ Vertex 3
120gb OCZ Vertex 3


If you guys think my initial plan would work, I think I'd like to buy 2 2.5" drives and USB 3 enclosures. And then maybe like 5 2-3tb 3.5" drives and USB 3 enclosures. I'll just need suggestions as to what else to buy. Thoughts?

Frank Glencairn
01-31-2013, 07:29 PM
OCZ has a pretty bad rap to it, regarding speed and sudden death.

I would change that to Kingston or Sandisk.

This is one of the external USB3 drives I use, pretty rugged by military specs, which is great when you are shooting in the field (pun intended).


The DashDrive Durable HD710 external hard drive has arrived, providing mobile, rapid, and dependable data access in a rugged and sporty package. The housing of the HD710 is comprised of a unique silicone material, and the drive incorporates military-grade shockproof and waterproof (IPX7) construction with an ultra-fast USB 3.0 interface. Its lively outlook and dynamic design match the requirements and style of sports and outdoor enthusiasts, with color options including blue, yellow, and black. No more worries about losing valuable data due to spilled drinks. The DashDrive Durable HD710 passed the stringent IEC 529 IPX7 test, in which the device proved water-tight after being submerged in meter-deep water for up to 30 minutes. The DashDrive Durable HD710 also passed the stringent Military MIL-STD-810G 516.5 drop test. This drive is capable of handling the toughest conditions, and still deliver the blazing fast USB 3.0 transmission speed consumers have come to expect.

2186

http://www.amazon.com/DashDrive-Military-Spec-External-AHD710-1TU3-CYL-Yellow/dp/B007GJ4GOE

karn105
01-31-2013, 08:49 PM
As someone who onemanbands a lot my advice is don't expect to be able to dump in the field. Have enough media to shoot all day and dump at night.
Any reason why you don't just get matching sized drives for the cam? Are you shooting raw because you are going to fill up those cards really fast. Also, you need two copies of everything before you format a card.

Kholi
01-31-2013, 08:58 PM
Your bottle neck is just pure speed if you're shooting RAW, on the offloading side. I've spent a crapload of time trying to figure this out and realistically the slowest you can afford to go is USB3.0 in and out. That's the absolute minimum. Ideally you would do have two Seagate Thundebrolt docks (about 100.00 each) and about 4TB+ of Seagate Pocket drives (1TB EACH-- 75.00each), And then two 6TB Thunderbolt Setups that can toss everything on from those Pocket Drives at the end of the day/night as your redundancy.

Wipe the pocket drives once you know you're redundant, reuse them in the field.

You could do this same thing with USB3.0 and you may not actually notice the difference between that and Thunderbolt because the drives are still a primary bottleneck since they're not SSDs.

Or, of ourse, you could just buy a LOT of SSD's to record to, which will be expensive. The offset is that you can get rid of those/sell them after you've used them.

zachariahlewis
01-31-2013, 08:58 PM
That's good advice. That's just a lot of SSDs. Totally the nature of the beast, but if at all possible i would like to save money...

I do plan on shooting RAW just for the forgiving aspect of it. So you think I should have at least enough SSDs to last a whole day? in RAW, that's roughly like what? 3-4 480s?

zachariahlewis
01-31-2013, 09:04 PM
As someone who onemanbands a lot my advice is don't expect to be able to dump in the field. Have enough media to shoot all day and dump at night.
Any reason why you don't just get matching sized drives for the cam? Are you shooting raw because you are going to fill up those cards really fast. Also, you need two copies of everything before you format a card.
Also, I hadn't heard that the vertex's weren't getting good reviews. One is shipping with my cam. Hmmm.

zachariahlewis
01-31-2013, 09:13 PM
Your bottle neck is just pure speed if you're shooting RAW, on the offloading side. I've spent a crapload of time trying to figure this out and realistically the slowest you can afford to go is USB3.0 in and out. That's the absolute minimum. Ideally you would do have two Seagate Thundebrolt docks (about 100.00 each) and about 4TB+ of Seagate Pocket drives (1TB EACH-- 75.00each), And then two 6TB Thunderbolt Setups that can toss everything on from those Pocket Drives at the end of the day/night as your redundancy.

Wipe the pocket drives once you know you're redundant, reuse them in the field.

You could do this same thing with USB3.0 and you may not actually notice the difference between that and Thunderbolt because the drives are still a primary bottleneck since they're not SSDs.

Or, of ourse, you could just buy a LOT of SSD's to record to, which will be expensive. The offset is that you can get rid of those/sell them after you've used them.

Yeah, that was sort of what I figured out for the hard drives being the bottleneck anyway. No sense in a Thunderbolt system really. Definitely couldn't afford to purchase all SSDs. That would be nice though. In RAW, we're talking about an hour per 480gb?

Frank Glencairn
02-01-2013, 10:32 AM
Just found this here. Nice little RAID1 backup solution in your pocket for 80 bucks (plus drives).
Maybe not the fastest solution, but the single drive is always the bottleneck for RAID1.
You usually have to pay with speed for safety.


The Taurus Mini offers high performance with RAID 0 as well as secure data protection with RAID 1, a versatile interface for high speed data transfers and a built-in LCD display for the configuration of the device as well as the display of event messages. The 2.5" SATA hard drives can be replaced easily due to the removable tray system and the drives are kept cool by the extra large heat sink.

Features
-Configurable hardware RAID controller (RAID 1 mirroring and RAID 0 striping)
-LCD display for easy device configuration and access to detailed information about the drives
-Critical parameters such as HDD temperature can be monitored easily with help of the LCD display
-Utilizes Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology also known as S.M.A.R.T. to obtain data directly from the HDD
-Versatile interface, including eSATA, FireWire 800 and USB 2.0
-Hardware acceleration of RAID rebuild
-2TB volume option for systems that do not support large volumes
-Extra large heat sink for excellent heat dissipation
LCD Display
The Taurus Mini Super-S comes equipped with a built-in LCD display for easy device configuration, event messages and access to detailed information about the external hard drives. Critical parameters such as HDD temperature can be monitored easily with the help of the LCD display. It utilizes Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology also known as S.M.A.R.T. to obtain data directly from the HDD.

http://www.dinic.de/External-enclosure-INXTRON/2-5in-InXtron-SK-2500/2-5-TAURUS-Mini-RAID-0-1-for-2x-SATA-HDDs::7824.html?XTCsid=b9vv6icnsdepmtpjpkltjrpri2

zachariahlewis
02-01-2013, 09:46 PM
Frank, I love the idea that it's creating a mirror as I'm copying it, but I don't see how it could work well in a workflow like this. I just think FW800 just won't be fast enough for capture. And obviously it wouldn't be a good end "final" storage because it can only handle 2TB total (1TB RAIDED).

Frank Glencairn
02-02-2013, 02:47 AM
Quote from the site:


Versatile interface, including eSATA,

:)

And yeah, this is for field storage only.

I imagine a scenario where you do this mirrored dumping on set, and back them up to proper storage after shooting and clear those little drives to be ready for the next day. 2-3 of them (depending on your ratio), should take you through a whole day. If you are on a budget, even one would do, you just have to swap in new drives.

funwithstuff
02-02-2013, 04:55 AM
One handy trick is that the Seagate BackupPlus (previously GoFlex) series of portable drives has a removable back which plugs straight into an SSD's SATA interface. I use mine in the field for instant offloading and client approvals, and a regular SATA dock at home. Yes, I agree that USB3 is the minimum, and Thunderbolt would be ideal. Maybe a Thunderbolt RAID for the final resting place for all your footage?

But first, if you're handling a lot of footage, shooting ProRes instead of RAW will make your life much easier. Do some serious testing to see if you really, really need Raw before you commit to it.

zachariahlewis
02-02-2013, 10:42 AM
One handy trick is that the Seagate BackupPlus (previously GoFlex) series of portable drives has a removable back which plugs straight into an SSD's SATA interface. I use mine in the field for instant offloading and client approvals, and a regular SATA dock at home. Yes, I agree that USB3 is the minimum, and Thunderbolt would be ideal. Maybe a Thunderbolt RAID for the final resting place for all your footage?

But first, if you're handling a lot of footage, shooting ProRes instead of RAW will make your life much easier. Do some serious testing to see if you really, really need Raw before you commit to it.

Do you think something like this would be good?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812226052

And this is what you're talking about, right?

http://www.adorama.com/SEGSTAE104.html?gclid=CJfetfr6l7UCFQq0nQod3B0ApQ

With either of these, I think it'd be the easiest thing to do at least from the SSD