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Brad Ferrell
10-12-2012, 08:42 AM
Sony KDL40EX640 40" Class 1080p 240Hz LED TV with WiFi Adapter

Mfr: Sony Model: KDL40EX640
UPC: 027242838574

I got an incredible deal on this set. They're out of stock, so I got a raincheck for $499. I plan on using this with my BMD Intensity Pro for a reference monitor. What do you guys think? The picture is beautiful at 24P.

It also has 240HZ which I find really helpful to put myself on the set and check things out. Watching Avatar in another store, I felt like I could breakdown the shot alot easier and reverse engineer from there. I do prefer 24P for watching films.

So, is this a good deal and worth 500 bones?

Philip Lipetz
10-12-2012, 09:03 AM
Almost all Sony LCD TVs have a faulty remote receiver that fails in the second year. literally over half of them. Check the boards. Sony will not do a recall nor have they changed them. I have one. Never again with SOny.

razz16mm
10-12-2012, 09:47 AM
I like LG's or Panasonics. LG's are ISF(Imaging Science Foundation) certified and have expert calibration modes with extended menus for accurate reference calibration with a colorimeter. They also have an excellent built in guided calibration wizard that will get you to an accurate basic reference by eye. I grade on a 32" LG to an expert mode calibration, then check the grade through all the standard factory calibrations to see how well it holds up for typical out of the box home viewing setups.

Brad Ferrell
10-12-2012, 10:10 AM
What's the model number on that LG? Remember I'm getting this one for $499.

razz16mm
10-12-2012, 11:55 AM
What's the model number on that LG? Remember I'm getting this one for $499.

My 32" is 3 years old. I paid $379 for it at H.H. Gregg on model year closeout sale.

Current equivalent model: http://www.lg.com/us/tvs/lg-32CS560-lcd-tv

Should be able to find it around or under $400.00. A 42" will run about $150 more. Go shopping. Any of the 32" and up now are all true 10 bit deep color displays and ISF
certified. The LG plasmas have better black levels and you can find 42" models starting around $550. But the LCD blacks are very good on these when calibrated. If there is any ambient light in your grading environment you won't see the difference.

Much better color grading monitor for video than any low cost computer display.

yoclay
10-12-2012, 01:12 PM
Color correction should be done on a grading monitor. Using television's in this way is more or less pissing in the dark.
The reason you see certain Panasonic's in gradiing suites is as a client monitor or to see how the image holds up after correction in terms of artifacting.
Additionally, they are often calibrated independantly by a service which costs at least $500 a pop.
For CC work, you need a properly calibrated grading monitor, and we are not talking a puck from B&H or blue gun.

FSI is a good starting place for proper kit.

Brad Ferrell
10-12-2012, 01:26 PM
I'm pretty sure I can hit my mark pissing in the dark with one of these TVs and scopes. So, no on the Sony and yeah on the LG?

Matthew Sonnenfeld
10-12-2012, 11:43 PM
It's true Brad, TVs are just not designed for this type of work. Different manufacturers have different specifications and different looks. Sony and Samsung tend to pop more or over sharpen, while Panasonic is more of a true image though less vivid. Not much experience with LG. I personally have a Panasonic G25 50" plasma because that one was their only model THX certified at the time and I like the Panasonic image, and while I love it, it's a tv, not a grading monitor. Even with a THX calibration, I wouldn't trust it. If it's not designed for grading, it won't be designed for accuracy. Unlike TV's where manufacturers compete for the sharpest, brightest, highest resolution, etc., broadcasts monitor manufacturers compete for accuracy and consistency. If you can't afford FSI, look to the HP DreamColor.

Brad Ferrell
10-13-2012, 07:13 AM
Matthew, that is a much more mature response than mine was, for sure.

Of course I'd love to use a calibrated broadcast monitor, but with the cost of the new camera, rigging, and the new computer, my upgrade potential has deminished.

I'll check out the HP's.

Brad Ferrell
10-13-2012, 07:51 AM
HP's are too expensive for me right now. I don't trust the Korean panel either, I like a little more control over my panels.

I think I'll wait around for the Sony. I've got two plasmas, an HD and a 4K projector, and plenty o' mac and pc screens to see my results on. I used to work in a recording studio and the first test of any mix we did in the studio went straight out into a car and was tested on the cassette player in the vehicle. If it sounded good, we kept the mix. Still pissing in the dark, even with "professional" equipment and professional monitors.

Brad Ferrell
10-23-2012, 09:02 AM
update: did not spend the money on the TV. Saving it for something better. Using 720P Panasonic Plasma for now.

Watermoore
10-30-2012, 10:29 PM
Color correction should be done on a grading monitor. Using television's in this way is more or less pissing in the dark.
The reason you see certain Panasonic's in grading suites is as a client monitor or to see how the image holds up after correction in terms of artifacting.
Additionally, they are often calibrated independantly by a service which costs at least $500 a pop.
For CC work, you need a properly calibrated grading monitor, and we are not talking a puck from B&H or blue gun.

FSI is a good starting place for proper kit.

I could be completely talking out my rear end here but if you look at the situation practically you can come up with a financially practical solution that's not as accurate as a grading monitor but gets you much closer in the ball park. I am my own boss so my solution is by no means industry standard here but it works for me.

I bought a hand full of IPS monitors by LG. They seem to do just fine for my business. They are not top of the line IPS panels either, I think i paid just over 300 dollars a piece for them. My experience is that they seem to produce color fairly consistently in their sRGB mode in comparison with my HDTV's. When I produce a product I always screen it on all of my HDTV's to see how much the appearance varies from TV to TV vs my monitor. They definitely vary from TV set to TV set but I figure as long as the image looks similar across the board then I am good shape. I screen it on a 42 inch Samsung 1080P, an old school 1st gen 42 inch Vizio 1080i set (it's really horrendous with clipping black levels) and my 55 inch Panasonic plasma. If I can get a decent look across all tv's simply using my IPS panel to grade and small little 24 inch HDTV as reference for full screen play back then I couldn't imagine you would be that far off doing the same. Let's face it, every TV interprets the signal differently, as long as your not going for some wild look in your film ala "300" you would probably be better off spending the money on something that has a bigger impact on your production. use your scopes and histograms to make sure your signal is legal and go with what looks acceptable.

Take that with a grain of salt because my end users are local businesses screening my work in their lobby's or on the web. I am not making products that are going out for mass distribution or broadcast. So I guess my point is to think about where your end product is going to end up and how critical will they (the viewer or client) will be about your color grade. I am not trying to say grading monitors are useless, I am just trying to say that in the grand spectrum of all that is important in this field, its easy to get hung up on technical specs and addicted to "technical perfection". Often times we forget at the end of the day most common people or end users cant even discern the difference between an HD and SD signal.

razz16mm
10-31-2012, 08:00 AM
A consumer TV or projector that carries ISF-CCC certification can be calibrated as accurately as any dedicated broadcast monitor. They have all the necessary controls and panel quality to do so. They are a much better reference than any computer monitor.
No question true broadcast reference monitors can be better, though not necessarily. If you are looking to spend less than $1k, I would take a Panasonic or LG consumer plasma over anything else. Less than $500, my personal choice would still be an LG LCD.
I am a video engineer and my company sells and installs projectors and flat panel displays for a full range of applications, including precisely color matched and calibrated multi-display video walls.

Brad Ferrell
10-31-2012, 08:34 AM
good to hear, good to hear.

loic
11-03-2012, 11:51 AM
A good option for your first purchase of a color correction accurate screen is this one: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/735978-REG/Sony_LMD_2110W_LMD_2110W_21_5_Professional_LCD.htm l