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Taikonaut
09-28-2014, 08:24 AM
Is this "Fusion"?


http://vimeo.com/100095868

Tim Hole
09-28-2014, 08:26 PM
I know that they used Fusion so I would say most likely. Fusion was designed for doing this kind of thing, and is very capable at doing it...and faster than most. The fluid simulations were probably done in Realflow and the modelling was probably Maya and Zbush.

I don't know what plans BMD have for Fusion but if they want to build on the user base of it, they will have to encourage some people like Digital Tutors or those Nuke heads over at FXPHD to do some good indepth courses. There is a dire lacking in Fusion online courses out there. Unless I've just never come across them. I tried Fusion back in 2001 when they revamped the UI but it seemed so overcomplicated I didn't bother learning it. I've come across it may times since then and its been used on projects but I've never really got into it. I would like to though because it is a smooth running ship.

Halsu
09-29-2014, 07:10 AM
I know that they used Fusion so I would say most likely. Fusion was designed for doing this kind of thing, and is very capable at doing it...and faster than most. The fluid simulations were probably done in Realflow and the modelling was probably Maya and Zbush.

I too have heard good things about Nuke, but it's noteworthy that the same results could be done in a rather wide array of software.

4saken
09-29-2014, 09:51 AM
Mackevision doesn't use Fusion, they use Nuke like any other big post house in the VFX business. Almost no one uses Fusion anymore. Fluid simulation was done in Naiad and lighting, shading & renderin in 3dsmax with Vray, not Maya.

Tim Hole
10-04-2014, 06:46 PM
Mackevision doesn't use Fusion, they use Nuke like any other big post house in the VFX business. Almost no one uses Fusion anymore. Fluid simulation was done in Naiad and lighting, shading & renderin in 3dsmax with Vray, not Maya.

Pixomondo is one of the biggest vendors with GOT and they do use Fusion extensively. As do MPC and Framestore.

But that's by-the-by, there is very little that couldn't be done in Fusion, its a very well-rounded, deeply featured tool. Nuke is the reigning champion at the moment. We'll see what happens if they follow Autodesk's subscription decision.

4saken
10-05-2014, 07:16 PM
Not sure who told you that about Pixomondo, but that is not true anymore. They used Fusion till about 2007/2008 and then switched to Nuke. I know that because I've worked as a freelancer on and off for them since 2007. One of the projects was Game of Thrones Season 2 and the other big one was Star Trek.
They haven't used Fusion in years and their current pipeline is Nuke only for TV shows/feature film. Some motion graphic and commercial stuff is still done in After Effects.
Here's a link to a current job posting from their LA office for a senior compositor: http://www.pixomondo.com/jobs/senior-compositor-4/
They clearly state Nuke in the description.

Fusion is a great tool, I used to do lots of compositing work with it for years, but some parts of it are just not that great for implementing it into a big feature film pipeline. That's one of the main reasons why it lost so much marked share in the past.